Jude the Obscure

Front Cover
Wordsworth Editions, 1995 - Fiction - 379 pages

Introduction and Notes by Norman Vance, Professor of English, University of Sussex.

Jude Fawley is a rural stone mason with intellectual aspirations. Frustrated by poverty and the indifference of the academic institutions at the University of Christminster, his only chance of fulfilment seems to lie in his relationship with his unconventional cousin, Sue Bridehead. But life as social outcasts proves undermining, and when tragedy occurs, Sue has no resilience and Jude is left in despair.

Hardy's portrait of Jude, the idealist and dreamer who is a prisoner of his own physical nature, is one of the most haunting and desperate of his creations. Jude the Obscure is a dark yet compassionate account of the insurmountable frustrations of human existence which reflect Hardy's yearning for the spiritual values of the past and his despair at their decline.

 

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Soul Crusher

User Review  - Monica C - Borders

Thomas Hardy's portrayl of a low born aspiring scholar is heart wreching. Jude starts as a well read boy working to support himself and takes a journey that leaves him broken and loveless. Thomas ... Read full review

Review: Jude the Obscure

User Review  - Paul - Goodreads

I used to think of Thomas Hardy as the American Theodore Dreiser. But after finishing "Jude the Obscure," I think he's more accurately described as the Anti-Dickens. Dickens' good, simple, humble ... Read full review

Contents

At Charminster
67
At Melchester
112
At Aldbrickham and Elsewhere
227
NOTES TO THE TEXT
363
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Thomas Hardy was born on June 2, 1840, in Higher Bockhampton, England. The eldest child of Thomas and Jemima, Hardy studied Latin, French, and architecture in school. He also became an avid reader. Upon graduation, Hardy traveled to London to work as an architect's assistant under the guidance of Arthur Bloomfield. He also began writing poetry. How I Built Myself a House, Hardy's first professional article, was published in 1865. Two years later, while still working in the architecture field, Hardy wrote the unpublished novel The Poor Man and the Lady. During the next five years, Hardy penned Desperate Remedies, Under the Greenwood Tree, and A Pair of Blue Eyes. In 1873, Hardy decided it was time to relinquish his architecture career and concentrate on writing full-time. In September 1874, his first book as a full-time author, Far from the Madding Crowd, appeared serially. After publishing more than two dozen novels, one of the last being Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Hardy returned to writing poetry--his first love. Hardy's volumes of poetry include Poems of the Past and Present, The Dynasts: Part One, Two, and Three, Time's Laughingstocks, and The Famous Tragedy of the Queen of Cornwall. From 1833 until his death, Hardy lived in Dorchester, England. His house, Max Gate, was designed by Hardy, who also supervised its construction. Hardy died on January 11, 1928. His ashes are buried in Poet's Corner at Westminster Abbey.

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