Heidegger and the Essence of Man

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SUNY Press, 1993 - Philosophy - 195 pages
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Michel Haar argues that Heidegger went too far in transferring all traditional properties of man to being. Haar examines what is left, after this displacement, not only of human identity, but perhaps more importantly, of nature, life, embodiment - of the flesh of human existence. This sensitive yet critical reading of Heidegger raises such issues in relation to questions of language, technology, human freedom, and history. In doing so, it provides a compelling argument for the need to rethink what it means to be human.
 

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Contents

BeingTowardsDeath and the Limits
3
The Call of Conscience or the Limits of Daseiris
17
The Limits of Resoluteness and the Initially Latent
27
Part Two The Poverty of Homo Humanus
57
The False Symmetry of the Double Relation
63
Mans Relation to Being
69
Beings Relation to Man
111
Historial Figures of Human Being
145
Works Cited
189
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About the author (1993)

Michel Haar is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Paris, Sorbonne.

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