A Room of One's Own

Front Cover
CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, Apr 15, 2009 - Electronic books - 100 pages
A Room of One's Own written by legendary author Virginia Woolf is widely considered to be one of the top 100 greatest books of all time. This great classic will surely attract a whole new generation of readers. For many, A Room of One's Own is required reading for various courses and curriculums. And for others who simply enjoy reading timeless pieces of classic literature, this gem by Virginia Woolf is highly recommended. Published by Classic House Books and beautifully produced, A Room of One's Own would make an ideal gift and it should be a part of everyone's personal library.

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User Review  - VhartPowers - LibraryThing

I'm only half way through, but thus far, sigh, it's so monotonous and she goes on and on repetitively about men. Alright already, we got it! I find it interesting that in just 54 pages she has already ... Read full review

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User Review  - dchaikin - LibraryThing

37. A Room of One's Own (audio) by Virginia Woolf reader: Juliet Stevenson published: 1929, 2011 audio format: 5:02 Libby audiobook Read full review

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About the author (2009)

Virginia Woolf was born in London, England on January 25, 1882. She was the daughter of the prominent literary critic Leslie Stephen. Her early education was obtained at home through her parents and governesses. After death of her father in 1904, her family moved to Bloomsbury, where they formed the nucleus of the Bloomsbury Group, a circle of philosophers, writers, and artists. During her lifetime, she wrote both fiction and non-fiction works. Her novels included Jacob's Room, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, Orlando, and Between the Acts. Her non-fiction books included The Common Reader, A Room of One's Own, Three Guineas, The Captain's Death Bed and Other Essays, and The Death of the Moth and Other Essays. Having had periods of depression throughout her life and fearing a final mental breakdown from which she might not recover, Woolf drowned herself on March 28, 1941 at the age of 59. Her husband published part of her farewell letter to deny that she had taken her life because she could not face the terrible times of war.

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