The Origin of Species (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Dent, 1909 - Evolution - 551 pages
28 Reviews
First published in 1859, this landmark book on evolutionary biology was not the first to deal with the subject, but it went on to become a sensation—and a controversial one for many religious people who could not reconcile Darwin’s science with their faith. Darwin worked on the book for over 20 years before its publication. The radical crux of his scientific theory was the idea of natural selection, which meant that chance, not a divine Creator, played a great role in humanity's advancement and that individuals who weren't physically able to adapt with the greater populace died off.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
20
4 stars
4
3 stars
2
2 stars
0
1 star
2

The BIBLE of Biology

User Review  - Preyas Pandya - Flipkart

A must have for every biology student. Charles Darwin has been an inspiration for aspiring biologists like me and several others. This book is a high level book and include all the meticulously researched and proven principles of evolution as suggested by Sir Charles Darwin. Amazing Book! Read full review

A Work of Genius and Intensive Labour

User Review  - Diksha Kale - Flipkart

Charles Darwin faced hell for writing the most revolutionary book in the history of biology. But after finishing this book, I am sure he felt it was all worth it. Mind you, this is not a coffee table ... Read full review

Contents

I
25
II
58
III
76
IV
93
V
145
VI
178
VII
219
VIII
262
IX
298
X
333
XI
364
XII
395
XIII
427
XIV
450
XV
499
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 97 - Nature's productions should be far " truer " in character than man's productions ; that they should be infinitely better adapted to the most complex conditions of life, and should plainly bear the stamp of far higher workmanship...
Page 210 - If it could be proved that any part of the structure of any one species had been formed for the exclusive good of another species, it would annihilate my theory, for such could not have been produced through natural selection.
Page 398 - Every species has come into existence coincident both in space and time with a pre-existing closely allied species.
Page 78 - Nothing is easier than to admit in words the truth of the universal struggle for life, or more difficult — at least I have found it so — than constantly to bear this conclusion in mind.
Page 192 - If it could be demonstrated that any complex organ existed which could not possibly have been formed by numerous, successive, slight modifications, my theory would absolutely break down.
Page 23 - ... and as, consequently, there is a frequently recurring struggle for existence, it follows that any being, if it vary however slightly in any manner profitable to itself, under the complex and sometimes varying conditions of life, will have a better chance of surviving, and thus be naturally selected. From the strong principle of inheritance, any selected variety will tend to propagate its new and modified form.
Page 22 - ... species had not been independently created, but had descended, like varieties, from other species. Nevertheless, such a conclusion, even if well founded, would be unsatisfactory, until it could be shown how the innumerable species inhabiting this world have been modified, so as to acquire that perfection of structure and coadaptation which justly excites our admiration.
Page 94 - Several writers have misapprehended or objected to the term Natural Selection, Some have even imagined that natural selection induces variability, whereas it' implies only the. preservation of such variations as arise and are beneficial to the being under its conditions of * life.
Page 46 - We cannot suppose that all the c — ac x1 breeds were suddenly produced as perfect and as useful as we now see them ; indeed, in many cases, we know that this has not been their history. The key is man's power of accumulative selection : nature gives successive variations ; man adds them up in certain directions useful to him.
Page 88 - Throw up a handful of feathers, and all must fall to the ground according to definite laws ; but how simple is this problem compared to the action and reaction of the innumerable plants and animals which have determined, in the course of centuries, the proportional numbers and kinds of trees now growing on the old Indian ruins...

Bibliographic information