Rites of Conquest: The History and Culture of Michigan's Native Americans

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University of Michigan Press, 1992 - History - 333 pages
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For many thousands of years before the arrival of Europeans, Michigan's native peoples, the Anishnabeg, thrived in the forests and along the shores of the Great Lakes. Theirs were cultures in delicate social balance and in economic harmony with the natural order. Rites of Conquest details the struggles of Michigan Indians - the Ojibwa, Ottawa, and Potawatomi, and their neighbors - to maintain unique traditions in the wake of contact with Euro-Americans. The French quest for furs, the colonial aggression of the British, and the invasion of native homelands by American settlers is the backdrop for this fascinating saga of their resistance and accommodation to the new social order. Minavavana's victory at Fort Michilimackinac, Pontiac's attempts to expel the British, Pokagon's struggle to maintain a Michigan homeland, and Big Abe Le Blanc's fight for fishing rights are a few of the many episodes recounted in the pages of this book. -- from back cover.
 

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Contents

In the Beginning
1
A Sense of Time a Sense of Place
39
Coming of the Wemitigoji
74
The jagonash and the Chemokmon
128
The End of Power
164
Not the Feelings of Their Hearts
198
On White Mans Road
234
From Yesterday to Tomorrow
264
Bibliography
301
Index
323
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