Travels in Ceylon and Continental India: Including Nepal and Other Parts of the Himalayas, to the Borders of Thibet, with Some Notices of the Overland Route

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W. P. Kennedy, 1848 - History - 527 pages
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Page 31 - You have the Pyrrhic dance as yet, Where is the Pyrrhic phalanx gone? Of two such lessons, why forget The nobler and the manlier one?
Page 125 - The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as, at this day, to Indians known; In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd shade, High overarch'd, and echoing walks between : There oft the Indian herdsman, shunning heat, Shelters in cool, and tends his pasturing herds At loop-holes cut through thickest shade...
Page 87 - Yea, the stork in the heaven knoweth her appointed times ; and the turtle, and the crane, and the swallow, observe the time of their coming; but my people know not the judgment of the LORD.
Page 125 - Twas a fair scene wherein they stood, A green and sunny glade amid the wood, And in the midst an aged Banian grew. It was a goodly sight to see That venerable tree; For o'er the lawn, irregularly spread, Fifty straight columns propped its lofty head; And many a long, depending shoot, Seeking to strike its root, Straight, like a plummet, grew towards the ground.
Page 125 - TWAS a fair scene wherein they stood, A green and sunny glade amid the wood, And in the midst an aged Banian grew. It was a goodly sight to see That venerable tree, For o'er the lawn, irregularly spread, Fifty straight columns propt its lofty head ; And many a long depending shoot, Seeking to strike its root, Straight like a plummet, grew towards the ground. Some on the lower boughs which crost their way Fixing their bearded fibres, round and round, With many a ring and wild contortion wound ; Some...
Page 134 - Now (the people said) the English are indeed masters of the country; for they who possess the relic have a right to govern four kingdoms: this , for 2000 years, is the first time the relic was ever taken from us...
Page 125 - Some on the lower boughs which crossed their way, Fixing their bearded fibres round and round, With many a ring and wild contortion wound; Some to the passing wind, at times, with sway Of gentle motion swung; Others, of younger growth...
Page 130 - ... and is nearly semitransparent. It is very active, and is said occasionally to spring. Its powers of contraction and extension are very great. It is like a fine cord when fully extended, and its point is so sharp, that it easily makes its way through very small openings. It is supposed to have an acute sense of smell, for no sooner does a person stop where leeches abound, than they appear to crowd eagerly to the spot from all quarters. " Those who have had no experience of these animals,
Page 98 - The bread-tree, which, without the ploughshare, yields The unreap'd harvest of unfurrow'd fields, And bakes its unadulterated loaves Without a furnace in unpurchased groves, And flings off famine from its fertile breast, A priceless market for the gathering guest...
Page 184 - They immediately proceeded to their devotions. A priest, in his yellow robes, stood on the rock close to the impression of the foot, with his face to the people, who had ranged themselves in a row below ; some on their knees, with their hands uplifted, and joined palm to palm, and others bending forward, with their hands in the same attitude of devotion. The priest, in a loud clear voice, sentence by sentence, recited the articles of their religious faith, and duties ; and, in response, they repeated...

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