Mac OS X Leopard: The Missing Manual (Google eBook)

Front Cover
"O'Reilly Media, Inc.", Dec 7, 2007 - Computers - 912 pages
51 Reviews

With Leopard, Apple has unleashed the greatest version of Mac OS X yet, and David Pogue is back with another meticulous Missing Manual to cover the operating system with a wealth of detail. The new Mac OS X 10.5, better known as Leopard, is faster than its predecessors, but nothing's too fast for Pogue and this Missing Manual. It's just one of reasons this is the most popular computer book of all time.

Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, Leopard Edition is the authoritative book for Mac users of all technical levels and experience. If you're new to the Mac, this book gives you a crystal-clear, jargon-free introduction to the Dock, the Mac OS X folder structure, and the Mail application. There are also mini-manuals on iLife applications such as iMovie, iDVD, and iPhoto, and a tutorial for Safari, Mac's web browser.

This Missing Manual is amusing and fun to read, but Pogue doesn't take his subject lightly. Which new Leopard features work well and which do not? What should you look for? What should you avoid? Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, Leopard Edition offers an objective and straightforward instruction for using:

  • Leopard's totally revamped Finder
  • Spaces to group your windows and organize your Mac tasks
  • Quick Look to view files before you open them
  • The Time Machine, Leopard's new backup feature
  • Spotlight to search for and find anything in your Mac
  • Front Row, a new way to enjoy music, photos, and videos
  • Enhanced Parental Controls that come with Leopard
  • Quick tips for setting up and configuring your Mac to make it your own
There's something new on practically every page of this new edition, and David Pogue brings his celebrated wit and expertise to every one of them. Mac's brought a new cat to town and Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, Leopard Edition is a great new way to tame it.
  

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A great reference for a recent PC-to-Mac convert. - Goodreads
It covers it all in a easy to read format. - Goodreads
There are a lot of great tips on all kinds of topics. - Goodreads
I keep it right beside the computer for easy reference. - Overstock.com

Review: Mac OS X Leopard: The Missing Manual

User Review  - Liz - Goodreads

When I had to switch from Windows to Mac OS for work, a colleague suggested this series. This book was invaluable in learning how Macs work and getting comfortable and proficient with the new system ... Read full review

Review: Mac OS X Leopard: The Missing Manual

User Review  - Goodreads

When I had to switch from Windows to Mac OS for work, a colleague suggested this series. This book was invaluable in learning how Macs work and getting comfortable and proficient with the new system ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
The Mac OS X Desktop
15
Organizing Your Stuff
67
Spotlight
97
Dock Desktop and Toolbars
123
Programs in Mac OS X
147
Time Machine Syncing and Moving Data
221
Automator and AppleScript
249
Printing Faxing Fonts and Graphics
541
Sound Movies and Speech
573
The Unix Crash Course
609
Hacking Mac OSX
659
Mac OS Online
669
Mail and Address Book
695
Safari
751
iChat
773

Windows on Macintosh
287
The Components of Mac OS X
301
The Free Programs
353
CDs DVDs and iTunes
429
The Technologies of Mac
457
Networking File Sharing and Screen Sharing
505
SSH FTP VPN and Web Sharing
799
Appendixes
815
Troubleshooting
829
The WindowstoMacDictionary
843
Where to Go From Here
857
Copyright

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Page 8 - In an effort to keep the book as up-to-date and accurate as possible, each time we print more copies of this book, we'll make any confirmed corrections you've suggested. We'll also note such changes on the Web site, so that you can mark important corrections into your own copy of the book, if you like.
Page 8 - ... click again on the one they want. Other people like to press the mouse button continuously after the initial click on the menu title, drag down the list to the desired command, and only then release the mouse button. Either method works fine. Keyboard shortcuts. If you're typing along in a burst of creative energy, it's sometimes disruptive to have to take your hand off the keyboard, grab the mouse, and then use a menu (for example, to use the Bold command).
Page xv - The Missing Manual Series Missing Manuals are witty, superbly written guides to computer products that don't come with printed manuals (which is just about all of them). Each book features a handcrafted index; cross-references to specific page numbers (not just "see Chapter 14"); and RepKover, a detached-spine binding that lets the book lie perfectly flat without the assistance of weights or cinder blocks. Recent and upcoming titles include...
Page 7 - That's shorthand for a much longer instruction that directs you to open three nested folders in sequence, like this: "On your hard drive, you'll find a folder called System. Open it. Inside the System folder window is a folder called Libraries; double-click it to open it. Inside that folder is yet another one called Fonts. Double-click to open it, too.

About the author (2007)

David Pogue is an American technology writer and TV science presenter. He was born in 1963 and grew up in Shaker Heights, Ohio. Pogue graduated summa cum laude from Yale University in 1985, with distinction in music. After graduation, Pogue wrote manuals for music software, worked on Broadway and Off-Broadway productions, and wrote for Macworld Magazine. He wrote Macs for Dummies, which became the best-selling Mac title, as well as other books in the Dummies series. He launched his own series of humorous computer books entitled the Missing Manual series, which includes 120 titles. He spent 13 years as the personal-technology columnist for the New York Times, before leaving to found Yahoo Tech. In addition to how-to manuals, he wrote Pogue's Basics: Essential Tips and Shortcuts (That No One Bothers to Tell You) for Simplifying the Technology in Your Life, collaborated on The World According to Twitter, and co-authored The Weird Wide Web.

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