The Common Sense of Bicycling: Bicycling for Ladies : with Hints as to the Art of Wheeling--advice to Beginners--dress--care of the Bicycle--mechanics--training--exercise, Etc., Etc

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Brentano's, 1896 - Clothing and dress - 200 pages
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wonderful piece of history complete with illustrations

Contents

I
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II
8
III
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IV
21
V
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VI
37
VII
47
VIII
55
XIV
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XV
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XVI
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XVII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
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XXII
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X
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XI
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XII
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XIII
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Page ix - I HAVE found that in bicycling, as in other sports essayed by them, women and girls bring upon themselves censure from many sources. I have also found that this censure, though almost invariably deserved, is called forth not so much by what they do as the way they do it.
Page x - The needs of the bicyclist are an intelligent comprehension of the bicycle as a machine, an appreciative knowledge of the human machine that propels it, and a realization of the fact that rider and bicycle should form one combined mechanism. For this, a knowledge of the laws that determine the limits and possibilities of both mechanisms is necessary. The cyclist is limited, not only by laws physiological and laws mechanical, which determine when and for how long he may travel, but he is restricted...
Page 3 - ... been accomplished, is very striking. For the uninitiated and for some others, bicycling does not possess attractions. The bicycle is a familiar object, not compelling a second thought. One reason for this is that it is not really brought to the intelligent notice of the casual passer. The cyclist, to the stationary observer or the comparatively stationary pedestrian, is such a fleeting instantaneosity that, unless thrown among enthusiasts over the sport, few of the unenlightened would be tempted...
Page 156 - In a lever of the first class the fulcrum is between the weight and the point of application of the power.
Page 21 - Remember that the bicycle will go whereever the attention is directed. In sitting upon the wheel the spinal column should maintain the same vertical plane that the rear wheel does, and should not bend laterally to balance in the usual manner. A new balance must be acquired, and other muscular combinations than those that are familiarly called upon. To wheel by rule is the better plan until the natural balance of the bicyclist is developed. Sit erect and sit still. The bicycle must be kept from falling...
Page 79 - ... the other pleasures of the sport. The scorcher sees little, hears little, and is conscious of little but the exhilaration of the moment, and seems to be imbued with the idea of consuming a certain amount of tissue in a given time. Scorching is a form of bicycling hardly to be commended, and reckless scorching is to be condemned at all times.
Page 191 - ... experienced. Muscular work increases the quantity of carbonic acid in the blood, and the excess of this gas leads to an increase of the respiratory need. This is the explanation of the law which is deduced from the observation of phenomena, and which we here enunciate : The intensity of breathlessness during exercise is in direct proportion to the expenditure of force demanded by the exercise in a -given time. The cause of breathlessness is a kind of poisoning of the system with one of its own...
Page 165 - The saddle is one of the most important, if not the most important, part of the bicycle to study, as it should provide the fulcrum to work from.
Page 157 - Yet we know that in physics it has the definite meaning of "the immediate cause of a change in the velocity, or direction of motion of a body.
Page xi - ... their uses explained. Other topics considered are how the bicycle is propelled, and why it maintains its balance; what the cyclist should learn, how correct form may be attained and faults avoided, and what should be the essential features of the clothing worn. The author wishes to acknowledge indebtedness to Dr. Legrange, and to Messrs. D. Appleton & Co. for their permission to quote from " Physiology of Bodily Exercise.

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