Peddling Prosperity: Economic Sense and Nonsense in the Age of Diminished Expectations

Front Cover
W. W. Norton & Company, 1995 - Business & Economics - 303 pages
15 Reviews
The past twenty years have been an era of economic disappointment in the United States. They have also been a time of intense economic debate, as rival ideologies contend for policy influence. Above all, they have been the age of the policy entrepreneur -the economic snake-oil salesman, right or left, who offers easy answers to hard problems. It started with the conservative economists - Milton Friedman at their head - who made powerful arguments against activist government that had liberals on the defensive for many years. Yet when Ronald Reagan brought conservatism to power, it was in the name not of serious thinkers but of the supply-siders, whose ideas were cartoon-like in their simplicity. And when the dust settled, it was clear that the supply-side treatment not only had cured nothing, but had left behind a $3 trillion bill.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
5
4 stars
6
3 stars
2
2 stars
1
1 star
1

Review: Peddling Prosperity: Economic Sense and Nonsense in an Age of Diminished Expectations

User Review  - Noah Howe - Goodreads

The lack of scholarship displayed in this book made it hard to read. Krugman often resorts to personal attacks to discredit his intellectual opponents. This book sucked. Read full review

Review: Peddling Prosperity: Economic Sense and Nonsense in an Age of Diminished Expectations

User Review  - Vipul Vivek - Goodreads

What pain it was to read Krugman blow Galbraith into smithereens! Read full review

Contents

Looking for Magicians
3
THE RISE OF CONSERVATIVE ECONOMICS
21
CONSERVATIVES IN POWER
107
THE PENDULUM SWINGS
195
The Strategic Traders
245
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1995)

Paul Krugman is the recipient of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Economics. He is a best-selling author, columnist, and blogger for the New York Times, and is a professor of economics and international affairs at Princeton University.

Bibliographic information