Dirty Money

Front Cover
Grand Central Publishing, Apr 23, 2008 - Fiction - 288 pages
12 Reviews
"[One] of the greatest writers of the twentieth century...Richard Stark, real name Donald Westlake...His Parker books form a genre all their own."
--John Banville, Booker Prize-winning author of The Sea

Master criminal Parker takes another turn for the worse as he tries to recover loot from a heist gone terribly wrong. In Nobody Runs Forever, Parker and two cohorts stole the assets of a bank in transit, but the police heat was so great they could only escape if they left the money behind. In this follow-up novel, Parker and his associates plot to reclaim the loot, which they hid in the choir loft of an unused country church. As they implement the plan, people on both sides of the law use the forces at their command to stop Parker and grab the goods for themselves. Though Parker's new getaway van is an old Ford Econoline with "Holy Redeemer Choir" on its doors, his gang is anything but holy, and Parker will do whatever it takes to redeem his prize, no matter who gets hurt in the process.

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Review: Dirty Money (Parker #24)

User Review  - Goodreads

Reading all 24 in a row was quite an experience. Parker is loathesome, and he needs to have a separate source of income to stay afloat, considering everything that goes wrong with his heists. And ... Read full review

Review: Dirty Money (Parker #24)

User Review  - M. Matheson - Goodreads

Parker the protagonist is actually calmed a little in this book. He is the bad guy's hero. A heinous brute with a zen disposition who only kills because it needs done. You will love Parker start with ... Read full review

Contents

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THREE
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Massachusetts FOUR
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Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Richard Stark was one of the many pseudonyms of Donald E. Westlake (1933-2008), a prolific author of crime fiction. In 1993, the Mystery Writers of America bestowed the society's highest honor on Westlake, naming him a Grand Master.

Bibliographic information