Dissertation, exhibiting a general view of the progress of mathematical and physical science since the revival of letters in Europe

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A. Constable & Company, 1822 - Science
 

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Page 163 - his fabric of the Heavens Hath left to their disputes, perhaps to move His laughter at their quaint opinions wide Hereafter, when they come to model Heaven And calculate the stars, how they will wield The mighty frame, how build, unbuild, contrive To save appearances, how gird the sphere With centrick and eccentrick scribbled o'er, Cycle and epicycle, orb in orb.
Page 163 - when they come to model Heaven And calculate the stars, how they will wield The mighty frame, how build, unbuild, contrive To save appearances, how gird the sphere With centrick and eccentrick scribbled o'er, Cycle and epicycle, orb in orb.
Page 115 - mind which could form such a plan beforehand, and trace not merely the outline, but many of the most minute ramifications, of sciences which did not yet exist, must be an object of admiration to all succeeding ages. He is destined, if, indeed, any thing in the world be so destined, to remain an
Page 73 - we should generalize slowly, going from particular things to those that are but one step more general ; from those to others of still greater extent, and so on to such as are universal. By such means, we may hope to arrive at principles, not vague and obscure, but luminous and well-defined, such as nature herself will not refuse to acknowledge.
Page 109 - crucis is of such weight in matters of induction, that in all those branches of science where it cannot easily be resorted to, (the circumstances of an experiment being out of our power, and incapable of being varied at pleasure,) there is often a great want of conclusive evidence. This holds of agriculture, medicine, political
Page 114 - later ; and whether there be not, with respect to the heavenly bodies, a true time and an apparent time, no less than a true place and an apparent place, as astronomers say, on account of parallax. For it seems incredible that the species or rays of the celestial bodies can pass through the immense

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