The Twelve Caesars

Front Cover
Penguin, Dec 31, 2002 - Fiction - 363 pages
175 Reviews
As private secretary to the Emperor Hadrian, Suetonius gained access to the imperial archives and used them (along with carefully gathered eye-witness accounts) to produce one of the most colourful biographical works in history. 'The Twelve Caesars' chronicles the public careers and private lives of the men who wielded absolute power over Rome, from the foundation of the empire under Julius Caesar and Augustus, to the decline into depravity and civil war under Nero, and the recovery and stability that came with his successors. A masterpiece of anecdote, wry observation and detailed physical description, 'The Twelve Caesars' presents us with a gallery of vividly drawn - and all too human - individuals.
 

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It's detailed, easy to read, and reliable. - Goodreads
An excellent overview of the men who ruled their world. - Goodreads
This may be because Joesphus is writing about the - Goodreads
One of the reference companions to Gibbon. - Goodreads

Review: The Twelve Caesars

User Review  - Tatyana Farber - Goodreads

Amazing look into the lives and history of the first 12 Caesars with great anecdotes! Read full review

Review: The Twelve Caesars

User Review  - Joćo Fernandes - Goodreads

Example "Oh look this guy Nero seems alright why do people say he burned down Rome he is like Augustus 2.0". *few pages later* "How pathetic, this idiot is just competing in and "winning" all music ... Read full review

All 41 reviews »

Selected pages

Contents

JULIUS CAESAR
1
AUGUSTUS
45
TIBERIUS
108
GAIUS CALIGULA
150
CLAUDIUS
183
NERO
213
GALBA
249
OTHO
262
VESPASIAN
281
TITUS
296
DOMITIAN
303
Key to Terms
321
Key to Place Names
327
Maps
331
Notes
343
Index of Personal Names and Peoples
351

VITELLIUS
270

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About the author (2002)

Robert Graves (also known as Robert Ranke Graves) was born in 1895 in London and served in World War I. Goodbye to All That: an Autobiography (1929), was published at age thirty three, and gave a gritty portrait of his experiences in the trenches. Graves edited out much of the stark reality of the book when he revised it in 1957. Although his most popular works, I, Claudius (1934) and its sequel, Claudius the God and His Wife Messalina (1935), were produced for television by the BBC in 1976 and seen in America on Masterpiece Theater, he was also famous as a poet, producing more than 50 volumes of poetry. Graves was awarded the 1934 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for both I, Claudius and Claudius the God. Also a distinguished academic, Graves was a professor of English in Cairo, Egypt, in 1926, a poetry professor at Oxford in the 1960s, and a visiting lecturer at universities in England and the U.S. He wrote translations of Greek and Latin works, literary criticism, and nonfiction works on many other topics, including mythology and poetry. He lived most of his life in Majorca, Spain, and died after a protracted illness in 1985.

About the Authors:
Michael Grant is a well-known classical scholar and the author of many books on classical mythology. John Hazel, also a classical scholar, is the editor of an edition of Ovid's poetry.

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