Memoir of the Life of Laurence Oliphant and of Alice Oliphant, His Wife, Volume 2

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Page 75 - ... after chalking my designation on the door, to prevent the room being occupied in my absence, I started off to bring my traps from the carriage, and any provender I could lay my hands on. I came in for a slice of beef, while the distribution was being made to some soldiers, and was soon comfortably established by the side of a roaring fire broiling a steak, and most eagerly waited upon by my two charming hostesses. I soon after won their complete confidence by turning off a rather noisy band of...
Page 76 - ... mark of their confidence by hearing one of them snore. The weather was so boisterous on the following day, that it was impossible to continue the march, so I brought enough provisions to my hut for all three, and paid for my accommodation so liberally when I left the day after, — as I felt it was an act of charity which would be highly applauded by the proprietors of the journal I served, and out of whose pockets it came...
Page 74 - I heard the key turn, and a woman's voice timidly inquired what I wanted. I said I would explain as soon as I was let in, and, pushing the door open, I found myself in a room lighted only by the dying embers of a fire. Striking a lucifer match, I became aware of the presence of two young women, aged eighteen or twenty, shivering with terror, one of them weeping bitterly. These I attempted to reassure by the most dulcet tones and pacific gestures. I explained my forlorn condition, expressed my willingness...
Page 40 - And the nations of them which are saved shall walk in the light of it: and the kings of the earth do bring their glory and honour into it.
Page 76 - They were very poor, and there was literally only one room in the house. This contained two beds, one of which was usually occupied by the young married couple, while her sister slept in the other. They were hung with heavy blue curtains, which completely enveloped them. The sheets were coarse, but clean ; and I had a good supply of my own rugs. When the cravings of my appetite had been appeased, I suggested in the most delicate manner that I should go to bed first, pull the curtains together, and...
Page 177 - ... agricultural point of view, but the inclusion of the Dead Sea within its limits would furnish a vast source of wealth, by the exploitation of its chemical and mineral deposits. The supply of chlorate of potassium, 200,000 tons of which are annually consumed in England, is practically inexhaustible ; while petroleum, bitumen, and other lignites can be procured in great quantities upon its shores. There can be little doubt, in fact, that the Dead Sea is a mine of unexplored wealth, which only needs...
Page 74 - ... found myself in a room lighted only by the dying embers of a fire. Striking a lucifer match, I became aware of the presence of two young women, aged eighteen or twenty, shivering with terror, one of them weeping bitterly. These I attempted to reassure by the most dulcet tones and pacific gestures. I explained my forlorn condition, expressed my willingness to sleep under a hedge rather than cause them one moment's uneasiness, painted in strong language the dangers which surrounded them in the...
Page 53 - near" voice, he was generally rapid and vivacious ; when he exchanged it for his "far-off" one, he was solemn and impressive. His hair, which had once been raven black, was now streaked with grey, but it was still thick, and fell in a massive wave over his ears, and nearly to his " shoulders, giving him something of a leonine aspect. His brow was overhanging and bushy, and his eyes were like revolving lights in two dark caverns, so fitfully did they seem to emit flashes, and then lose all expression....
Page 42 - Reformers fail because they change the letter, And not the spirit, of the world's design. Tyrant and slave create the scourge and fetter — As is the worshipper, will be the shrine. The ideal fails, though perfect were the plan, World-harmony springs through the perfect man.

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