Contributions to the Early History of the North-west: Including the Moravian Missions in Ohio

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Poe & Hitchcock, 1864 - Frontier and pioneer life - 240 pages
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Page 45 - ... thickets that abound for several miles to the west of it. His knowledge of the country and wonderful activity enabled him to elude his enemies, and reach the settlements on the South of the Ohio river, which he crossed by swimming. The hill near whose base this adventure is said to have happened, still goes by his name, and the incident is often referred to by the traveler, as the coach is slowly dragged up its side.
Page 51 - This party had murdered several families, and with the plunder had recrossed the Ohio before effectual pursuit could be made. By Brady a party was directly summoned, of his chosen followers, who hastened on after them; but the Indians having one or two days the start, he could not overtake them in time to arrest their return to their villages. Near the spot where the town of Ravenna now stands, the Indians separated into two parties, one of which went to the north, and the other west, to the falls...
Page 209 - WAKE, our souls ! away, our fears -'*- Let every trembling thought be gone ; Awake, and run the heavenly race, And put a cheerful courage on...
Page 44 - Horror-struck at the sudden outrage, the Indians simultaneously rushed to rescue the infant from the fire. In the midst of this confusion, Brady darted from the circle, overturning all that came in his way, and rushed into the adjacent thickets, with the Indians yelling at his heels.
Page 43 - In one of his adventurous trapping excursions to the waters of the Beaver River, or Mahoning, which in early days so abounded with the animals of this species, that it took its name from this fact, it so happened that the Indians surprised him in his camp, and took him prisoner. To have shot or tomahawked him on the spot would have been but a small gratification...
Page 51 - Camp,' after an old Indian of that name, who lived there when the whites first came into the country on the Monongahela River. This party had murdered several families, and, with the ' plunder,' had recrossed the Ohio before effectual pursuit could be made. By Brady a party was directly summoned of his chosen followers, who hastened on after them ; but the Indians, having one or two days the start, he could not overtake them in time to arrest their return to their villages.
Page 54 - It so happened that, in the opposite cliff, the leap was favoured by a low place, into which he dropped, and, grasping the bushes, he thus helped himself to ascend to the top of the cliff. The Indians, for a few moments, were lost in wonder and admiration ; and, before they had recovered their recollection, he was half-way up the side of the opposite hill, but still within reach of their rifles.
Page 53 - Having, in peaceable times, often hunted over this ground with the Indians, and knowing every turn of the Cuyahoga as familiarly as the villager knows the streets of his own hamlet, Brady directed his course to the river, at a spot where the whole stream is compressed, by the rocky cliffs, into a narrow channel of only...
Page 43 - ... presence of all the Indians of their village. He was therefore taken alive to their encampment, on the west bank of the Beaver River, about a mile and a half from its mouth. After the usual exultations and rejoicings at the capture of a noted enemy, and causing him to run the gauntlet, a fire was prepared, near which Brady was placed, after being stripped naked, and with his arms unbound.
Page 45 - ... and laurel thickets that abound for several miles to the west of it. His knowledge of the country and wonderful activity enabled him to elude his enemies, and reach the settlements on the South of the Ohio river, which he crossed by swimming.

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