Spirituality, Diversion, and Decadence: The Contemporary Predicament

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SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1992 - Religion - 350 pages
This book presents a philosophical rethinking of the meaning and nature of spiritual discipline. It offers a new way of describing and justifying practices like praying, meditating, fasting, and yoga, and it provides an innovative case for their contemporary importance.

Spiritual discipline is especially effective at combatting Pascalian diversion, the pursuit of activities that occupy the mind just enough to avoid thinking about important things; and Nietzschean decadence, the proclivity for extirpating instinctive drives instead of satisfying or sublimating them. In addition to overcoming diversion and decadence in contemporary consumerist culture, VanNess recommends spiritual discipline as a means of political resistance to powerful institutions which seek to exercise social control in democratic societies by promulgating addictive patterns of consumption.

Finally, he argues that regimens of spiritual discipline can serve healthful and liberating purposes, and generally promote fullness of life, only insofar as they are shaped by an ethos of intellectual criticism and aesthetic experimentation.
 

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Contents

A Historical Perspective 19
23
A Contemporary Evaluation
47
Semiotic SelfReference
95
Physical Symmetry
125
Biological Equilibration
159
Nietzsches Negation
203
A Novel Response
233
Beyond Diversion and Decadence
273
Select Bibliography
311
Index
335
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

Peter H. VanNess is Assistant Professor of Philosophy of Religion at Union Theological Siminary in New York City.

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