The Oxford Handbook of Religion and the Arts

Front Cover
Frank Burch Brown
OUP USA, 2014 - Art - 541 pages
More than ever before, scholars recognize that nearly every form of religion or spirituality has a vital connection with art. World religions, from Hinduism to The Eastern Orthodox Church, have a long and rich relationship with an array of artistic traditions. In recent decades, the academic study of religion and the arts has burgeoned. Yet a broad and serious consideration of the topic has yet to reach readers. The first comprehensive book of its kind, The Oxford Handbook of Religion and the Arts provides expert guidance to artistry and aesthetic theory in religion. Edited by Frank Burch Brown, the Handbook brings together an international team of leading scholars to present an interdisciplinary volume of nearly forty original essays. Readers are presented the main topics, issues, methods, and resources for the study of religious and theological aesthetics. The essays give light to the dynamic interaction of world religions and art making. The volume ranges from antiquity to present day to examine idolatry, aesthetics in liturgy, and the role of art in popular religion. Ranging from music and poetry to architecture and film, the Handbook crosses the boundaries of different faiths and art forms to survey established and pioneering voices within the field. An authoritative text for scholars and students, The Oxford Handbook of Religion and the Arts will remain an invaluable resource for years to come.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Mapping the Terrain of Religion and the Arts
1
PART I RELIGIOUS AESTHETICS
23
PART II ARTISTIC WAYS OF BEING RELIGIOUS
107
PART III RELIGIOUS WAYS OF BEING ARTISTIC
255
PART IV ISSUES AND THEMES
401
Index
523
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2014)


Frank Burch Brown is Frederick Doyle Kershner Professor of Religion and the Arts at Christian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis, and was recently Alexander Campbell Visiting Professor of Religion and the Arts at the University of Chicago Divinity School. He is the author of five books, including Religious Aesthetics (1989) and Good Taste, Bad Taste, Christian Taste: Aesthetics in Religious Life (2000). He is also a composer, with twenty commissioned works.

Bibliographic information