Dostoevsky and the Christian Tradition

Front Cover
George Pattison, Diane Oenning Thompson, Catriona Kelly
Cambridge University Press, Sep 6, 2001 - Literary Criticism - 281 pages
Dostoevsky is one of Russia's greatest novelists and a major influence in modern debates about religion, both in Russia and the West. This collection brings together Western and Russian perspectives on the issues raised by the religious element in his work. The aim of this collection is not to abstract Dostoevsky's religious 'teaching' from his literary works, but to explore the interaction between his Christian faith and his writing. The essays cover such topics as temptation, grace and law, Dostoevsky's use of the gospels and hagiography, Trinitarianism, and the Russian tradition of the veneration of icons, as well as reading aloud, and dialogism. In addition to an exploration of the impact of the Christian tradition on Dostoevsky's major novels, Crime and Punishment, The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov, there are also discussions of lesser-known works such as The Landlady and A Little Boy at Christ's Christmas Tree.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Reading Dostoevsky religiously
1
I
2
II
4
III
32
IV
34
V
44
VI
54
VII
72
X
137
XI
159
XII
176
XIII
192
XIV
229
XV
240
XVI
260
XVII
278

VIII
106
IX
119

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

Dianne Oenning Thompson is an affiliated lecturer in the Slavonic Department at the University of Cambridge and has taught Russian literature in the United States.

George Pattison is Dean of Chapel at King's College, Cambridge.

Bibliographic information