Broca's Brain: Reflections on the Romance of Science

Front Cover
Ballantine Books, 1980 - Science - 398 pages
0 Reviews
Carl Sagan, writer and scientist, returns from the frontier to tell us about how the world works. In his delightfully down-to-earth style, he explores and explains a mind-boggling future of intelligent robots, extraterrestrial life and its consquences, and other provocative, fascinating quandries of the future that we want to see today.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

SCIENCE AND H U MAN CON C E R N 1 Brocas Brain
3
Can We Know the Universe? Reflections on a Grain of Salt
15
That World Which Beckons Like a Liberation
22
In Praise of Science and Technology
38
Sense and Nonsense at the Edge of Science
51
White Dwarfs and Little Green Men
77
Venus and Dr Velikovsky
95
Norman Bloom Messenger of God
151
Kalliope and the Kaaba
233
The Golden Age of Planetary Exploration
240
Will You Walk a Little Faster?
255
Via Cherry Tree to Mars
262
Experiments in Space
269
In Defense of Robots
280
The Past and Future of American Astronomy
293
The Quest for Extraterrestrial Intelligence
314

Science FictionA Personal View
162
O U R N E I G B O R H o O D IN SPACE 10 The Suns Family
175
A Planet Named George
188
Life in the Solar System
206
Titan the Enigmatic Moon of Saturn
214
The Climates of Planets
222
U L TIMATE QUESTIONS 23 A Sunday Sermon
329
Gott and the Turtles
342
The Amniotic Universe
353
References
369
Index
383
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1980)

Carl Sagan served as the David Duncan Professor of Astronomy and Space Sciences and Director of the Laboratory for Planetary Studies at Cornell University. He played a leading role in the Mariner, Viking, Voyager, and Galileo spacecraft expeditions, for which he received the NASA Medals for Exceptional Scientific Achievement and (twice) for Distinguished Public Service.

His Emmy- and Peabody-winning television series, Cosmos, became the most widely watched series in the history of American public television. The accompanying book, also called Cosmos, is one of the bestselling science books ever published in the English language. Dr. Sagan received the Pulitzer Prize, the Oersted Medal, and many other awards--including twenty honorary degrees from American colleges and universities--for his contributions to science, literature, education, and the preservation of the environment. In their posthumous award to Dr. Sagan of their highest honor, the National Science Foundation declared that his "research transformed planetary science . . . his gifts to mankind were infinite." Dr. Sagan died on December 20, 1996.

Bibliographic information