The Mining Magazine: Devoted to Mines, Mining Operations, Metallurgy, &c., &c, Volume 8

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Page 534 - Surely there is a vein for the silver, And a place for gold where they fine it. Iron is taken out of the earth, And brass is molten out of the stone.
Page 261 - PRACTICAL MINER'S GUIDE; Comprising a Set of Trigonometrical Tables adapted to all the purposes of Oblique or Diagonal, Vertical, Horizontal, and Traverse Dialling ; with their application to the Dial, Exercise of Drifts, Lodes, Slides, Levelling, Inaccessible Distances, Heights, &c.
Page 545 - ... in their corporate name to sue and be sued, appear, prosecute and defend all actions and causes to final judgment and execution, in any court of law or equity...
Page 104 - It is well known that the affinity of silica for alkali is so feeble that it may be separated from this base by the weakest acids, even by carbonic acid. According to the expectation of those who recommend the silification of stone, the carbonic acid of the atmosphere will set the silica free from the water-glass, and the silica, thus separated, will be deposited within the pores and around the particles of the stone. The points of contact of these particles will thus be enlarged, and a sort of glazing...
Page 359 - The sum of the three angles of every plane triangle being equal to half a circle, or 180 degrees, it therefore follows that if either acute angle, in such triangle, be taken from 90, the remainder will be the other acute angle, or the complement. The supplement of any angle is what that angle wants of 180; hence the supplement of any one angle is always equal to the sum of the other two. A few other properties of right-angled triangles may be worthy of notice, viz.: when the angle opposite the...
Page 161 - After the speech was made, drew up a memorial to the Legislature, praying the passage of a law authorizing the commissioners to give a mining lease on the school section. The memorial was signed by a majority of the citizens, and, on personal application, the law was passed, and under it the lease was taken. "In May, 1850, commenced mining in the woods. In the same year sunk two shafts, and obtained copper from both of them. The excavations made did not exceed twelve feet — at that depth the copper...
Page 332 - Warren, and within an area of three hundred and sixty square miles. Although some of them have been worked for a century and a half, and in early days furnished a very large proportion of the ore manufactured into iron in this country, yet they have been excavated to a very limited extent, many of them containing immense bodies of ore above water-level which may be economically extracted without the employment of expensive machinery. It is estimated that they could be made to yield, advantageously,...
Page 347 - The tensions of the hydraulic press of the national forges, are given by means of an excellent apparatus, which indicates the results with the greatest precision. An immense number of experiments have been made with this press, not only upon all the irons of France, but upon the best irons of England, Sweden, Spain and Siberia ; never, until the present assay, bu any bar been tried, the abtolute tenacity of which surpassed 40 kilogrammes per millimetre. (Signed,) TH. BORNET, Chef des Travaux aux...
Page 160 - Told the people that as soon as the mines could be opened, their condition would be improved, and that civilization, intelligence, comfort and wealth would be tho inevitable results. At tlie conclusion of this remark, a speaker arose in the crowd, and informed me that a large portion of the inhabitants had come here to get away from civilization, and if it followed them, they would run again.
Page 232 - ... called the alloy ;" and with this meaning the word is still used by our assayers of gold and silver. But it is clear, from the very nature of the example here chosen, that no admixture of one base metal with another like itself, could generate an alloy in the opinion of writers of the old school ; nor can we anywhere find that brass, bell-metal, &c., were called alloys, until mixed with gold or silver. , If, however, we now proceed to examine the meaning of the expression alloy, in the present...

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