Charles Darwin's Works: The movements and habits of climbing plants

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D. Appleton, 1876 - Science
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Page 215 - For, to those advanced students who have kept well abreast oi the chemical tide, it offers a calm philosophy. To those others, youngest of the class, who have emerged from the schools since new methods have prevailed, it presents a generalization, drawing to its use all the data, the relations of which the newly-fledged fact-seeker may but dimly perceive without its aid. ... To the old chemists, Prof. Cooke's treatise is like a message from beyond the mountain. They have heard of changes in the science;...
Page 215 - This admirable monograph, by the distinguished Erving Professor of Chemistry in Harvard University, is the first American contribution to 'The International Scientific Series,' and a more attractive piece of work in the way of popular exposition upon a difficult subject has not appeared in a long time. It not only well sustains the character of the volumes with which it is associated, but its reproduction in European countries will be an honor to American science.
Page 220 - FUNGI; their Nature, Influence, and Uses. By MC COOKE, MA. LL. D. Edited by Rev. MJ BERKELEY, MA, FLS With 109 Illustrations. Price, $1.50.
Page 213 - ... from giving a fuller account of these suggestive essays, only because we are sure that our readers will find it worth their while to peruse the book for themselves ; and we sincerely hope that the forthcoming parts of the 'International Scientific Series' will be as interesting."— A theneeum'
Page 217 - But he has certainly done much to clear the science of law from the technical obscurities which darken it to minds which have had no legal training, and to make clear to his ' lay ' readers in how true and high a sense it can assert its right to be considered a science, and not a mere practice.
Page 218 - ... subject his own. By the originality of his conceptions, the ingenuity of his constructions, the skill of his analysis, and the perseverance of his investigations, he has surpassed all others in the power of unveiling the complex and intricate movements of animated beings." — Popular Science Monthly, XII. History of the Conflict between Religion and Science. By JOHN WILLIAM DRAPER, MD, LL. D., Author of " The Intellectual Development of Europe.
Page 213 - Mr. Bagehot's style is clear and vigorous. We refrain from giving a fuller account of these suggestive essays, only because we are sure that our readers will find it worth their while to peruse the book for themselves; and we sincerely hope that the forthcoming parts of the 'International Scientific Series
Page 213 - ... which is not only very lucid and charming, but also original and suggestive in the highest degree. Nowhere since the publication of Sir Henry Maine's 'Ancient Law,' have we seen so many fruitful thoughts suggested in the course of a couple of hundred pages. . . . To do justice to Mr. Bagehot's fertile book, would require a long article.
Page 209 - Personally and practically exercised in zoology, in minute anatomy, in geology, a student of geographical distribution, not in maps and in museums, but by long voyages and Laborious collection; having largely advanced each of these branches of science, and having spent many years in gathering and sifting materials for his present work, the store of accurately-registered facts upon which the author of the 'Origin of Species' is able to diaw at will, is prodigious.
Page 214 - While, in the strongest manner, asserting the union of mind with brain, he yet denies 'the association of union in place* but asserts the union of close succession in time,' holding that ' the same being is, by alternate fits, under extended and under unextended consciousness.

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