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Oxford University Press, 1858 - Questions and answers
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The real beauty can't be seen, we should feel it.

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Page 306 - Then Peter opened his mouth, and said, "Of a truth I perceive that God is no respecter of persons: But in every nation he that feareth him, and worketh righteousness, is accepted with him.
Page 407 - Doth any man doubt, that if there were taken out of men's minds vain opinions, flattering hopes, false valuations, imaginations as one would, and the like, but it would leave the minds of a number of men poor shrunken things, full of melancholy and indisposition, and unpleasing to themselves...
Page 128 - For he was of that stubborn crew Of errant saints, whom all men grant To be the true church militant ; Such as do build their faith upon The holy text of pike and gun ; Decide all controversies by Infallible artillery ; And prove their doctrine orthodox By apostolic blows and knocks...
Page 143 - Rather admire ; or, if they list to try Conjecture, he his fabric of the heavens Hath left to their disputes ; perhaps to move His laughter at their quaint opinions wide Hereafter; when they come to model heaven, And calculate the stars; how they will wield The mighty frame; how build, unbuild, contrive, To save appearances ; how gird the sphere With centric and eccentric scribbled o'er, Cycle and epicycle, orb in orb.
Page 302 - ... that a friend is far more than himself." Men have their time, and die many times in desire of some things which they principally take to heart; the bestowing of a child, the finishing of a work, or the like. If a man have a true friend, he may rest almost secure that the care of those things will continue after him; so that a man hath, as it were, two lives in his desires.
Page 306 - Behold, thou hast driven me out this day from the face of the earth; and from thy face shall I be hid: and I shall be a fugitive and a vagabond in the earth; and it shall come to pass, that every one that findeth me shall slay me.
Page 170 - tis true : The elder of them, being put to nurse, "Was by a beggar-woman stol'n away ; And, ignorant of his birth and parentage, Became a bricklayer when he came to age : His son am I ; deny it, if you can.
Page 409 - But why drives on that ship so fast, Without or wave or wind?' SECOND VOICE The air is cut away before, And closes from behind. Fly, brother, fly! more high, more high! Or we shall be belated: For slow and slow that ship will go, When the Mariner's trance is abated.
Page 161 - For those that fly may fight again, Which he can never do that's slain.
Page 235 - There taught us how to live; and (oh! too high The price for knowledge) taught us how to die.

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