The Life, Trial, and Death of Francisco Ferrer

Front Cover
Moffat, Yard and Company, 1911 - Education - 332 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 92 - ... children are separated from nature and life, the intellectual and moral discipline made use of to impose ready-made ideas upon them, beliefs which deprave and annihilate natural bent. Without fear of deceiving ourselves, we can restore the child to the environment which entices it, the environment of nature in which he will be in contact with all that he loves, and in which impressions of life will replace fastidious book-learning. If we did no more than that, we should already have prepared...
Page 92 - It is because the organization of the school, far from spreading the ideal which we imagined, has made education the most powerful means of enslavement in the hands of the governing powers today. Their teachers are only the conscious or unconscious instruments of these powers, modeled moreover according to their principles; they have from their youth up, and more than any one else, been subjected to the discipline of their authority; few indeed are those who have escaped the influence of this domination;...
Page 256 - Moret, when challenged to say whether he himself would have pardoned Ferrer, made no answer. It was difficult to answer a question which assumed Ferrer's guilt; for if he was guilty he deserved no pardon. But, whatever the attitude of the Liberals toward Ferrer, there is not the least doubt that the execration of Europe, with which in those •days the air was ringing, was the main factor in Maura's fall. The Government were forced to admit Morel's contention that "their unpopularity at home and...
Page 92 - Let us not fear to say that we want men capable of evolving without stopping, capable of destroying and renewing their environments without cessation, of renewing themselves also; men, whose intellectual independence will be their greatest force, who will attach themselves to nothing, always ready to accept what is best, happy in the triumph of new ideas, aspiring to live multiple lives in one life. Society fears such men; we therefore must not hope that it will ever want an education able to give...
Page 92 - ... arise and grow. We are convinced that the education of the future will be of an entirely spontaneous nature; certainly we cannot as yet realize it, but the evolution of methods in the direction of a wider comprehension of the phenomena of life, and the fact that all advances toward perfection mean the overcoming of some constraint, all this indicates that we are in the right when we hope for the deliverance of the child through science.
Page 147 - ... of the nuns having been tortured or even buried alive. It was found, as a matter of fact, that many of the bodies had their hands and feet bound together, and although this is susceptible of a quite innocent explanation, it was not unnaturally taken at first as confirming the most sinister rumors. To the AngloSaxon mind it would seem that when a community walls itself in from the world, and admits no intervention of the law, no public inspection of its practices, whether in life or death, it...
Page 90 - ... convinced that constraint arises only from ignorance, and that the educator who is really worthy of the name will obtain his results through the spontaneous response of the child, whose desires he will learn to know, and whose development he will try to further by giving it every possible gratification. But in reality, I do not believe that those who struggle for human emancipation can expect much from this method. Governments have ever been careful to hold a high hand over the education of the...
Page 140 - Crescent,' when it would be easy to form regiments of priests and monks who, besides being directly interested in the success of the Catholic religion, have no family or home, and are of no utility to the country.
Page 224 - ... him to Premia, which that gentleman, though shocked at his suggestions, agreed to do. At Premia they met the Alcalde, or Mayor, to whom Ferrer made similar proposals. Then, on their way back to Masnou, they met a group of young men coming from Barcelona, who told them what was going on, whereupon Ferrer said, ' Good! Good! Courage! It must all be destroyed !' " The Alcalde himself, Don Domingo Casas, and the acting secretary of the ayuntamiento Alvarez, are quoted as emphatically confirming the...

Bibliographic information