The Chicago School of Architecture: A History of Commercial and Public Building in the Chicago Area, 1875-1925

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University of Chicago Press, 1973 - Architecture - 238 pages
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This thoroughly illustrated classic study traces the history of the world-famous Chicago school of architecture from its beginnings with the functional innovations of William Le Baron Jenney and others to their imaginative development by Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright. The Chicago School of Architecture places the Chicago school in its historical setting, showing it at once to be the culmination of an iron and concrete construction and the chief pioneer in the evolution of modern architecture. It also assesses the achievements of the school in terms of the economic, social, and cultural growth of Chicago at the turn of the century, and it shows the ultimate meaning of the Chicago work for contemporary architecture.

"A major contribution [by] one of the world's master-historians of building technique."—Reyner Banham, Arts Magazine

"A rich, organized record of the distinguished architecture with which Chicago lives and influences the world."—Ruth Moore, Chicago Sun-Times
 

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Contents

ARCHITECTURE IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
1
CHICAGO 1871
14
NEW FORMS IN TRADITIONAL MATERIALS
26
JENNEY AND THE NEW STRUCTURAL TECHNIQUE
79
BURNHAM AND ROOT
95
D H BURNHAM AND COMPANY
108
HOLABIRD AND ROCHE
118
ADLER AND SULLIVAN
129
IN THE WAKE OF THE PIONEERS
145
HOTELS AND APARTMENTS
150
THE CHICAGO SCHOOL IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY
162
BIBLIOGRAPHY
223
INDEX
229
Copyright

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About the author (1973)

Carl W. Condit (1914-1997) was an historian of technology, urban development, and architecture. He was the author of numerous books on the history of American architecture, especially in Chicago, and taught history, art history, and urban affairs at Northwestern University for over thirty years.

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