Heidegger's Later Philosophy

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Cambridge University Press, 2002 - Philosophy - 132 pages
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Heidegger's later philosophy has often been regarded as a lapse into unintelligible mysticism. While not ignoring its deep and difficult complexities, Julian Young's book explains in simple and straightforward language just what it is all about. It examines Heidegger's identification of loss of 'the gods', the violence of technology, and humanity's 'homelessness' as symptoms of the destitution of modernity, and his notion that overcoming 'oblivion of Being' is the essence of a turning to a post-destitute, genuinely post-modern existence. Young argues that Heidegger's conception of such an overcoming is profoundly fruitful with respect to the ancient quest to discover the nature of the good life. His book will be an invaluable resource for both students and scholars of Heidegger's works.
 

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Contents

Being truth and metaphysics
5
The destitution of modernity
31
The essence of modern technology
37
Dwelling
63
The turning
75
Fatalism
83
The ethics of dwelling
91
Being a guardian
105
Fostering the growth of the saving Power
122
Index
129
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A Philosophy of Gardens
David E. Cooper
No preview available - 2006
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About the author (2002)

Julian Young is Honorary Research Associate at the University of Auckland. His publications include Nietzsche's Philosophy of Art (CUP, 1992) Heidegger, Philosophy, Nazism (CUP, 1997), and Heidegger's Philosophy of Art (CUP, 2001). He is currently working on a translation for Cambridge University Press of Heidegger's Holzwege.

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