One more Sunday

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Fawcett Crest, Feb 1, 1985 - Fiction - 436 pages
1 Review
Welcome to the Eternal Church of the Believer, where devout workers operate state-of-the-art computer equipment to solicit and process the thousands of dollars that pour in daily . . . where hundreds of prayers are offered by armies of believers . . . where some people give much more than they should.
Its home is Meadows Center, some very expensive real estate on the outskirts of a sleepy Southern town, a jealously guarded complex of offices, houses, schools, and, of course, churches.
Meet John Tinker Meadows, who heads the church now that his father is secretly dying . . . the Reverend Joe Deets, who lusts after very young women . . . Walter Macy, pompous and self-righteous, who blackmails his way to his secret ambition . . . the Reverend Mary Margaret Meadows, a powerhouse in her own right. And pity poor Roy Owen, an outsider who comes to Meadows Center on a desperate search for his wife, the journalist who vanished after asking some hard questions about the inner workings of the Eternal Church of the Believer . . . .
"Brilliantly done." -- The New York Times Book Review

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Review: One More Sunday

User Review  - Jim - Goodreads

It ain't Travis McGee but it was worth reading. Read full review

Review: One More Sunday

User Review  - Bonitagirl - Goodreads

This is not a Travis McGee book but it is by the same author. You know I can't remember what happens in this story but I remember LOVING the book. The theme has something to do with religion and I think a fake preacher. Hm. Maybe I should read this again. Read full review


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About the author (1985)

John D. MacDonald was born in Sharon, Pennsylvania in 1916. He attended Syracuse University for his B. S degree, then went on to Harvard University for his M. B. A. After serving during World War II, MacDonald published "Brass Cupcake," his first novel. By the time he had written over 40 novels, MacDonald had received the Ben Franklin Award, the Mystery Writers of America's Grandmaster Award, and the American Book Award. John D. MacDonald died in 1986 at St. Mary's Hospital in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, from complications of an earlier heart bypass operation.

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