Medea (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Prestwick House Inc, 2005 - Fiction - 80 pages
3 Reviews
To make Medea more accessible for the modern reader, our Prestwick House Literary Touchstone Edition includes a glossary of the more difficult words, as well as convenient sidebar notes to enlighten the reader on aspects that may be confusing or overlooked. In doing this, it is our intention that the reader may more fully enjoy the beauty of the verse, the wisdom of the insights, and the impact of the drama.Witch, barbarian, foreigner, or a woman wronged and committed to the most horrific kind of justice, Medea is a heroine who makes her audience shudder. Euripides shows us an astonishingly strong female protagonist, whom some readers have identified as the first feminist in Western literature. Seeing where her strength leads her, though, we must wonder if she was intended to be portrayed a model or as a warning.Because the three other plays that were traditionally performed with Medea have been lost, it is difficult to say whether Euripides? Athenian audience was as upset by the play as modern readers are. It won only third place at the biggest festival in the city, indicating that ancient audiences also found it controversial. With its still-relevant examination of marriage, love, and revenge, and its explicit scenes of mental and emotional agony, Medea continues to demand our attention.
  

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Review: Medea

User Review  - Rachel Friars - Goodreads

"And what is more, we've been born women, quite unable to manage noble deeds, but none more skilled when it comes to crafting every kind of evil." --Medea, the original Gone Girl. Read full review

Review: Medea

User Review  - Jane - Goodreads

If hell hath no fury like a woman scorned, imagine what's going to happen when you two-time on a goddess. Bad move, Jason. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

MEDEA
13
Mythology
64
An Overview
66
Tragedy and the City
67
Conventions of Greek Drama
69
Glossary
70
Vocabulary
72
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Euripides was born in Attica, Greece probably in 480 B.C. He was the youngest of the three principal fifth-century tragic poets. In his youth he cultivated gymnastic pursuits and studied philosophy and rhetoric. Soon after he received recognition for a play that he had written, Euripides left Athens for the court of Archelaus, king of Macedonia. Fragments of about fifty-five plays survive. Among his best-known plays are Alcestis, Medea and Philoctetes, Electra, Iphigenia in Tauris, The Trojan Women, and Iphigenia in Aulis Iphigenia. He died in Athens in 406 B.C.

Bibliographic information