The Coming Plague: Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance

Front Cover
Penguin Books, 1995 - Medical - 750 pages
16 Reviews
Unpurified drinking water. Improper use of antibiotics. Local warfare. Massive refugee migration. Changing social and environmental conditions around the world have fostered the spread of new and potentially devastating viruses and diseases—HIV, Lassa, Ebola, and others. Laurie Garrett takes you on a fifty-year journey through the world's battles with microbes and examines the worldwide conditions that have culminated in recurrent outbreaks of newly discovered diseases, epidemics of diseases migrating to new areas, and mutated old diseases that are no longer curable. She argues that it is not too late to take action to prevent the further onslaught of viruses and microbes, and offers possible solutions for a healthier future.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
7
4 stars
7
3 stars
1
2 stars
0
1 star
1

Review: The Coming Plague: Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance

User Review  - High Plains Library District - Goodreads

Want the skinny on Ebola? I mean, the answer to that is probably not because, frankly, it's kind of terrifying. Let me put that a different way. Want to hear actual facts and research about Ebola ... Read full review

Review: The Coming Plague: Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance

User Review  - Nick Black - Goodreads

pretty good. certainly thorough. "epidemic" is tossed around pretty liberally -- if a fever burns out a south american village, does it make a sound? poor editing, with numerous phrases and sentences ... Read full review

Contents

II
3
III
13
IV
30
Copyright

19 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1995)

Garrett is a Pulitzer Prize-winnng reporter who has been a health and science writer for Newsday since 1988, and a frequent contributor to such publications as The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Times, and Foreign Affairs. Previously, she was science correspondent for NPR.

Bibliographic information