The San Francisco Earthquake and Fire: A Brief History of the Disaste ; a Presentation of Facts and Resulting Phenomena, with Special Reference to the Efficiency of Building Materials, Lessons of the Disaster

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The Roebling Construction Co., 1906 - Earthquakes - 264 pages
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Page 273 - Disaster The predominant and most important of all lessons of the fire is the necessity of protecting window and door openings so as to prevent fire entering buildings through these openings. As in the case of the Baltimore fire, the flames were communicated to the fireproof buildings from the outside, through the windows and doors. Had the fire been kept out of these buildings by suitable materials and devices in the window and door openings, the interiors of these buildings would have been wholly...
Page 200 - ... about 5 ft. to the south. This distorted the sidewalk and steps of the two entrances, there being cracks in the joints of the cement sidewalk slabs 8" wide. It was necessary to place two temporary wooden steps of about 8...
Page 7 - Construction Co., of which he is chief engineer, will take a very high rank and possess permanent value among such documents. The report was exceedingly comprehensive and lucid. and will repay amply a review by every student of fire protection engineering.) The interesting development and the lessons of the disaster are set forth in detail in the report. As in the Baltimore fire, the contents of many of the fire-proof buildings would have been preserved had the (openings in the outside wa'lls been...
Page 272 - ... were completely destroyed, this building and its contents were preserved in their entirety by metal sash and frames with wire glass. The Lessons of the Disaster The glaring omission of the fireproof barriers for the exterior openings was the direct and sole cause of the damage and destruction of the interiors of nearly all the fireproof buildings. This detail in the present stage of fireproof construction is of paramount importance, and should receive special attention in all future buildings....
Page 140 - The facades consist of gray artificial stone to the water table, but terra cotta brick to half the height of the first story and white cement finish on common brick above. This building had a temporary wooden roof supported by the fourth floor, it being intended to increase the height of the building later. The top of the side walls and the parapet walls were overthrown, and portions of the walls were cracked and badly damaged by the earthquake. The two lower stories were provided with metal-covered...
Page 8 - ... report. As in the Baltimore fire, the contents of many of the fire-proof buildings would have been preserved had the (openings in the outside wa'lls been properly protected. Immediately after the fire I urged the necessity of protecting the openings in the strongest possible terms. The National Board of Fire Underwriters also pointed out the importance of these safeguards and fixed the insurance rates accordingly. Yet, strange to say, in the new building code of the city of Baltimore the protection...
Page 69 - Street front remains in good condition, there being no earthquake cracks and the cornice being only slightly spalled m spots on the east side at the second-story level. The Stockton Street front is also in good condition, excepting that there are slight earthquake cracks at the north and south corners at the second-floor level. The east brick wall is in good condition. In the South-east corner of the building, eight complete bays have collapsed and fallen from the roof to the basement. The elevator...
Page 272 - ... of Folsom and Hawthorne streets. This was a non-fireproof building with brick walls and wood floors. Although all the buildings around it were completely destroyed, this building and its contents were preserved in their entirety by metal sash and frames with wire glass. The Lessons of the Disaster The glaring omission of the fireproof barriers for the exterior openings was the direct and sole cause of the damage and destruction of the interiors of nearly all the fireproof buildings. This detail...
Page 269 - ... consumed. The United States Mint was equipped in the two lower stories with inside folding iron shutters, which were of material assistance in protecting this building against ignition. The most remarkable illustration of the advantage of window protection was shown in the case of the California Electric Company's building, at the northwest corner of Folsom and Hawthorne streets. This was a non-fireproof building with brick walls and wood floors. Although all the buildings around it were completely...

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