A Grammar of the Anglo-Saxon Tongue: With a Praxis

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Place of publication not identified Møller, 1830 - Anglo-Saxon language - 224 pages
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Page l - Hickes displays throughout great erudition, unwearied industry, and sometimes successful investigation ; it is enriched with numerous engravings of Ancient Monuments, Runic inscriptions, various documents, and specimens of poetry that are not elsewhere to be found in print.
Page xlviii - ... it was instantly banished from the court. William's laws even were issued in French. A fragment of the Saxon Chronicle, published by Lye, concluding with the year 1079, is still in pretty correct Anglo-Saxon; but in the continuation of the same Chronicle, from 1135 to 1140, almost all the...
Page xlvi - AngloSaxon tongue appears to have been in its origin a rude mixture of the dialects of the Saxons, the Angles, and the Jutes, but we are not acquainted with it in that state, these dialects having soon coalesced into one language, as the various kindred tribes soon united to form one nation, after they had taken possession of England. With the introduction of Christianity and the Roman alphabet, their literature began.
Page 131 - ... says—' The Saxon alliteration is thus constructed : in two adjacent and connected lines of verse there must be three words which begin with one and the same letter, so that the third or last alliterative word stands the first word in the second line, and the first two words are both introduced in the first line. The initial letters in these three words are called alliterative. The alliterative letter in the second line is called the chief letter, and the other two are called assistant letters...
Page lv - Anglo-Saxon grammar, observing that he did so, "after mature deliberation, the written Anglo-Saxon characters as they appear in MSS. being themselves a barbarous, monkish corruption of the Roman, and the printed ones a very imperfect imitation of the MSS. To persist, therefore, in the use of them, (however venerable their appearance,) seems to be without good reason : for though called Anglo-Saxon, they are no other than those employed at the same time in the writing of Latin; if, therefore, we...
Page xlvii - England, and no where has it left such manifest and indelible traces as in the English language. We have here an ancient, fixed, and regular tongue, which, during a space of five hundred years, preserved itself almost without change; for King Ethelbert adopted Christianity about 593 or 596, and his laws, which we may refer to about the year 600, are perhaps the oldest extant in Anglo-Saxon. In the year 1066, William...
Page xi - That the Angles were a Teutonic race is not only probable, but almost certain, from the fact, that the dialect of these invaders so soon coalesced into one common tongue, and assumed a character so decidedly Teutonic, that, with the exception of a few Normanisms, introduced in later times, there is scarcely a vestige deserving notice of the old Scandinavian, or of Danish structure, to be found in Anglo-Saxon ; so that in this respect, even the Old-Saxon bears a stronger resemblance to the Scandinavian...
Page 189 - A Saxon Treatise concerning the Old and New Testament, written about the Time of King Edgar (700...
Page xxiii - the Icelandic bear, for the most part, a strong resemblance " to the Swedish. ***** " But the oldest remains of the Danish language are to be " found on our Runic stone monuments, and here at length " it perfectly coincides with the earliest Swedish, Norwegian, " and Icelandic. ***** " The Danish is closely allied to the Swedish, and both, in " the earliest times, lapse into the Icelandic, which, according " to all ancient records, was formerly universal over all the " North, and must therefore...
Page 1 - As some of the Anglo-Saxon characters deviate a little in their form from the Latin, of which both they and the Gothic are...

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