Epidemics and Pandemics: Their Impacts on Human History

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ABC-CLIO, Jan 1, 2005 - History - 513 pages
2 Reviews
Hays (history, Loyola U. Chicago) describes, in a style accessible to high school students and up, the history of 50 epidemics in world history, from an unspecified disease that swept through Athens in 430-427 BC to a number of epidemics still plaguing the world today. Each chapter is organized into sections describing "when and where," historical significance, background, how it was understood at the time, responses, and unresolved historical issues. Each chapter also includes references and suggested additional readings. Also includes information on Aedes Aegypti, American Indians, antibiotics, Asia, asymptomatic carriers, bleeding, blood, burial considerations, children, China, contagion, diet, dysentery, economic circumstances, environmental considerations, fleas, flies, germ theory, will of gods, Waldemar Haffkine, humors, immunity, infants, inoculations, Islam, Edward Jenner, Robert Koch, laws, miasmas, microorganisms, migration, military affairs, morality, morbidity, mortality, mosquitoes, New York, pilgrimages, political impact, population levels, poverty, public health policies, quarantines, race, rehydration, religion, rodents, sanitation, slavery, social conditions, syphilis, trade considerations, transportation, rural areas, urban areas, vaccinations, venereal diseases, Vibrio cholerae, virgin soil infection, water contamination, women, World Health Organization, World War I, Yersinia pestis, etc.
 

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This book is a good book, but is too old. It's information is not up to date with the world we live in now. I wouldn't recommend this book for someone doing a project or research paper on this subject. I however, am a health care fanatic and love to read books like this, so I enjoyed it.

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Contents

1 EPIDEMIC IN ATHENS 430427 BCE
1
2 MALARIA IN ANCIENT ROME
9
3 PLAGUE OF THE ANTONINES
17
4 FIRST PLAGUE PANDEMIC 541747
23
5 SMALLPOX EPIDEMIC IN JAPAN 735737
31
6 LEPROSY IN MEDIEVAL EUROPE
35
7 SECOND PLAGUE PANDEMIC 13461844
41
8 FRENCH DISEASE IN SIXTEENTHCENTURY EUROPE
69
29 FOURTH CHOLERA PANDEMIC 18631875
267
30 CARRIÓNS DISEASE IN PERU 18701871
281
31 SMALLPOX IN EUROPE 18701875
287
32 MEASLES IN FIJI 1875
297
33 FIFTH CHOLERA PANDEMIC 18811896
303
34 INFLUENZA PANDEMIC 18891890
315
35 CHOLERA EPIDEMIC IN HAMBURG 1892
321
36 THIRD PLAGUE PANDEMIC 1894?
331

9 EPIDEMICS IN SIXTEENTHCENTURY AMERICA
79
10 EPIDEMICS AND THE THIRTY YEARS WAR 16181648
97
11 PLAGUE IN ITALIAN CITIES 1630s
103
12 EPIDEMICS IN CHINA 16401644
113
13 PLAGUE IN LONDON 1665
119
14 SMALLPOX IN ICELAND 17071709
131
15 PLAGUE IN MARSEILLES 17201722
135
16 SMALLPOX IN BOSTON 1721
143
17 SMALLPOX IN EIGHTEENTHCENTURY EUROPE
151
18 PLAGUE IN MOSCOW 1771
163
19 INFLUENZA PANDEMIC 17811782
171
20 YELLOW FEVER IN HISPANIOLA 17931804
177
21 YELLOW FEVER IN PHILADELPHIA 1793
185
22 FIRST CHOLERA PANDEMIC 18171824
193
23 CONSUMPTION IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
201
24 SECOND CHOLERA PANDEMIC 18271835
211
25 THIRD CHOLERA PANDEMIC 18391856
227
26 FEVERS AND THE GREAT FAMINE IN IRELAND 18461850
239
27 TYPHOID FEVER IN CITIES 18501920
249
28 YELLOW FEVER IN NEW ORLEANS 1853
259
37 SIXTH CHOLERA PANDEMIC 18991923
345
38 SLEEPING SICKNESS IN EAST CENTRAL AFRICA 19001905
355
39 TYPHOID MARYS EPIDEMICS
363
40 CHOLERA EPIDEMIC IN NAPLES 19101911
369
41 POLIOMYELITIS IN THE UNITED STATES 1916
377
42 INFLUENZA PANDEMIC 19181919
385
43 LUNG CANCER IN THE UNITED STATES MIDTWENTIETH CENTURY
397
44 POLIOMYELITIS IN THE UNITED STATES 19451955
411
45 SEVENTH CHOLERA PANDEMIC 1961PRESENT
421
46 AIDS IN THE UNITED STATES 1980s
427
47 CONTEMPORARY AIDS PANDEMIC
439
48 THE MAD COW CRISIS AND TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES 1985PRESENT
449
49 CONTEMPORARY MALARIA
457
50 CONTEMPORARY TUBERCULOSIS
465
EPILOGUE
473
SOME GENERAL BOOKS ON EPIDEMICS
479
GLOSSARY
481
INDEX
485
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
513
Copyright

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Page 6 - Nor was this the only form of lawless extravagance which owed its origin to the plague. Men now coolly ventured on what they had formerly done in a corner, and not just as they pleased, seeing the rapid transitions produced by persons in prosperity suddenly dying and those who before had nothing succeeding to their property. So they resolved to spend quickly and enjoy themselves, regarding their lives and riches as alike things of a day.
Page 4 - ... its ravages ; so that when they succumbed, as in most cases, on the seventh or eighth day to the internal inflammation, they had still some strength in them. But if they passed this stage, and the disease descended further into the bowels, inducing a violent ulceration there accompanied by severe diarrhoea, this brought on a weakness which was generally fatal.
Page 6 - Fear of gods or law of man there was none to restrain them. As for the first, they judged it to be just the same whether they worshipped them or not, as they saw all alike perishing...
Page 5 - ... this brought on a weakness which was generally fatal. For the disorder first settled in the head, ran its course from thence through the whole of the body, and even where it did not prove mortal, it still left its mark on the extremities; for it settled in the privy parts, the fingers and the toes, and many escaped with the loss of these, some too with that of their eyes. Others again were seized with an entire loss of memory on their first recovery, and did not know either themselves or their...
Page 4 - In most cases also an ineffectual retching followed, producing violent spasms, which in some cases ceased soon after, in others much later. Externally the body was not very hot to the touch, nor pale in its appearance, but reddish, livid, and breaking out into small pustules and ulcers. But internally it burned so that the patient could not bear to have on him clothing or linen even of the very lightest description, or indeed to be otherwise than stark naked.

About the author (2005)

J. N. Hays is professor emeritus of history at Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, IL

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