The English Gardener: Or, A Treatise on the Situation, Soil, Enclosing, and Laying-out, of Kitchen Gardens; on the Making and Managing of Hot-beds and Green-houses; and on the Propagation and Cultivation of All Sorts of Kitchen-garden Plants, and of Fruit-trees Whether of the Garden Or the Orchard. And Also, on the Formation of Shrubberies and Flower-gardens; and on the Propagation and Cultivation of the Several Sorts of Shrubs and Flowers. Concluding with A Kalendar, Giving Instructions Relative to the Sowings, Plantings, Prunings, and Other Labours ... in Each Month of the Year

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Published at 11, Bolt-Court, Fleet-Street; and may be had of all booksellers, 1833 - Fruit-culture - 338 pages
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Page 52 - THE weather for transplanting is the same as that for sowing. If you do this work in wet weather, or when the ground is wet, the work cannot be well done. It is no matter what the plant is, whether it be a cucumber plant, or an oak-tree. It has been •observed, as to seeds, that they like the earth to touch them in every part, and to lie close about them. It is the same with roots.
Page 8 - It was the spot where I first began to learn to work, or, rather, where I first began to eat fine fruit, in a garden ; and though I have now seen and observed upon as .many fine gardens as any man in England, I have never seen a garden equal to that of WAVERLEY.
Page 144 - When that month comes, dig a piece of ground well and truly, make it rich ; make it very fine, form it into beds three feet wide, draw drills across it at eight inches distance, make them from two to three inches deep, put in the seeds pretty thickly, cover them completely, tread the earth down upon them ; and then smooth the surface. When the plants come up, thin them to about three inches apart ; and keep the ground between them perfectly clean during the summer. Hoe frequently ; but not deep near...
Page 35 - ... at the bottom. Then you go on shaking the dung into this sort of box, dividing straw from straw, and mixing long and short duly together, in the same manner as was before directed in the case of the conical heaps, and taking care to keep beating the dung down with the prong in every part of the bed. When you have shaken on dung to the thickness of four or five inches, beat all over again, and so on at every four or five inches deep, until the work be finished. When you get to the top of the boards,...
Page 8 - ... work, or, rather, where I first began to eat fine fruit, in a garden ; and, though I have now seen and observed upon as many fine gardens as any man in England, I have never seen a garden equal to that of WAVERLEY. Ten families, large as they might be, including troops of servants (who are no churls in this way), could not have consumed the fruit produced in that garden. The peaches, nectarines, apricots, fine plums, never failed ; and, if the workmen had not lent a hand, a fourth part of the...
Page 29 - The edging ought to be clipped in the winter or very early in spring on both sides and at top; a line ought to be used to regulate the movements of the shears; it ought to be clipped again in the same manner about midsummer; and if there be a more neat and beautiful thing than this in the world, all that I can say is, that I never saw that thing.
Page 340 - OF ENGLAND; containing information of every kind, necessary to persons who are about to emigrate ; including several authentic and most interesting letters from English Emigrants, now in America, to...
Page 340 - THE EMIGRANT'S GUIDE : In ten letters, addressed to the Tax-payers of England ; containing Information of every kind necessary to persons who are about to emigrate ; including several authentic and most interesting Letters from English Emigrants, now in America, to their Relations in England.
Page 49 - THE first thing relating to sowing is the preparation of the ground. It may be more or less fine, according to the sort of seed to be sown. Peas and beans do not, of course, require the earth so fine as small seeds do. But, still, the finer the better for...

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