The history of Charlotte Summers, the fortunate parish girl, Volume 1

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Page 68 - Hold, Wench, you read too fast; and I don't understand one Word of what you are saying. ... I must not have got so far— Look back to the End of that Chapter where the Blockhead [sic] of an Author bids us take a Nap, and remember where he left off.— O la, Ma'am, I have found it; here it is. As your Ladyship said, he says . . ." (I, 68-69). She reads the conclusion of chapter four, a passage the reader has already encountered some pages previously. She then goes on reading aloud for sixteen pages,...
Page 29 - Father F g" only on the capricious side, taking seriously, as Fielding does not, the "Doctrine, that an Author, in spite of all critical Authority, has an absolute Right to digress when and where he pleases, and to amuse himself and his Readers with any thing that comes uppermost in his Head, whether it has any Connection with the Subject in Hand or not
Page 13 - ... Days, yet we Authors are always provided with an easy flying Carriage, which can waft our Readers in an Instant, much longer Journeys than this we are now setting out on: We are Masters of a Kind of Art Magic, that we have only to speak the Word, and presto, you are transported, in the very Position you chance to be in at the Time, to the Place where we would have you attend us. Don't you find already the magical Effect? The Journey is over, and we are just alighted at the Gate of a stately old...
Page 68 - ... tomfoolery concerning one pair of "readers," Miss Arabella Dimple and her Maid Polly. "Pray, Ma'am, where shall I begin, did your Ladyship fold down where you left off? No, Fool, I did not; the Book is divided into Chapters on Purpose to prevent that ugly Custom." They struggle with their memories: "Now I think on't, the Author bid me remember, that I left off at the End of 1 think it was the 6th Chapter. Turn to the 7th Chapter, and let me hear how it begins Polly reads, 'Chapter the 7th,—The...
Page 68 - passion" to complain about the story or the characters' behavior. The most curious instance of this independent drama of the telling is an audacious bit of tomfoolery concerning one pair of "readers," Miss Arabella Dimple and her Maid Polly. "Pray, Ma'am, where shall I begin, did your Ladyship fold down where you left off? No, Fool, I did not; the Book is divided into Chapters on Purpose to prevent that ugly Custom.
Page 13 - Jones, to a very long paragraph. Before I introduce my Readers into the Company of Miss Charlotte Summers, I must make them acquainted with some of her Friends ... for which Purpose, I must beg their Company as far as Carmarthenshire, in Wales. Tho' the Journey is pretty long, and, in the ordinary Way of travelling, may take up some Days, yet we Authors are always provided with an easy flying Carriage, which can waft our Readers in an Instant, much longer Journeys than this we are now setting out...
Page 60 - The old beldame laid it out like a dead cat, and in the dirty squalid "condition it was in, threw it naked into an old deal box, like any other "piece of lumber and went to feed the rest of the infants in the same "rugged brutish manner I mentioned to you before", (p.
Page 29 - Divisions in this Species of Writing to be like the Acts and Scenes in a Play; the main Design of which must be to give Time for shifting...
Page 215 - Distress but he feels it, and never wrote till he had wrought up his Imagination into a real Belief of the Reality of the Misfortune of his Heroine. His Sighs, his...

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