Varronianus: a critical and historical introduction to the philological study of the Latin language

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1860
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Contents

The Pelasoiansthe differences of thoir position in Italy and Greece respectively
12
Preserve their national integrity in Etruria
13
The Etruscansthe authors theory respecting their origin
16
The names Etruscus and Rasena cannot be brought to an agree ment with Tyrsenus
18
The legend that the Etruscans were Lydians is entirely destitute of historical foundation
20
It is explicitly stated by ancient writers that the Etruscans were connected with Rsetia
21
This view of the case is after all the most reasonable
23
It is confirmed by all available evidence and especially by the contrast between the town and country languages of ancient Etruria
24
further inferences derivable from a the traditionary history of the Lucbres
26
b Fragmentary records of tho early Constitution of Rome
28
c Etymology of some mythical proper names
29
General Conclusion as to the mutual Relations of the old Italian Tribes
33
CHAPTER II
35
Architecture
39
Supported by deductions from the contrasted mythology of the two races
44
Thracians Get and Scytliians
46
Scythians and Medes
48
Mode of discriminating tho ethnical elements in this chain of nations
50
Peculiarities of the Scythian Language suggested by Aristo phanes
52
Names of the Scythian rivers derived and explained
53
Names of the Scythian divinities
56
Other Scythian Words explained
60
fate of the Mongolian race
64
The Pelasgians were of Sclavonian origin
66
Foreign affinities of the Umbrians c
67
Further confirmation from etymology
70
Celtic tribes intermixed with the Sclavonians and Lithuanians in Italy and elsewhere
71
The Sarmatae probably a branch of the Lithuanian family
74
Gothic or LowGerman affinities of the ancient Etruscans shown by their ethnographic opposition to tho Veneti
75
Reasons for comparing the old Etruscan with the Old Norse
77
Teutonic peculiarities of the ancient Etruscans
80
Old Norse explanations of Etruscan proper names
83
Contacts and contrasts of the Semitic and the Sclavonian
87
Mill
88
Predominant Sclavonism of the old Italian languages
89
CHAPTER III
93
The Sibilants
97
Peculiarities by which tho old Italian Alphabets were distin guished
99
Umbrian Grammatical Forms
100
Selections from the Bugubine Tables with explanations
105
Tab I a 26
108
Tab I b 13 sqq
114
Extracts from the Litany in Tab VI a
115
The Atidian Augural Sacrifice
118
Umbrian words which approximate to their Latin synonyms
120
The Todi Inscription contains four words of the same class
123
CHAPTER IV
126
Alphabetical list of SabelloOscan words with their interpreta tion
128
The Bantine Table
139
Commentary on the Bantine Table
142
The Cippus Abellanus
151
The Bronze Tablet of Agnono
154
The Atellanse
156
CHAPTER V
164
Names of Etruscan divinities derived and explained
171
Alphabetical List of Etruscan Words interpreted
180
Etruscan InscriptionsDifficulties attending their Interpretation
196
Inscriptions in which the Pelasgian element predominates
198
Transition to the Inscriptions which contain Scandinavian words The laurelcrowned Apollo Explanations of the words Clan and Phleres
202
Inscriptions containing the words Suthi and Throe
208
Inferences derivable from the words Cver Sver and Thur or Thaur
210
Striking coincidence between the Etruscan and Old Norse in the use of the auxiliary verb Lata
212
The great Perugian Inscription critically examinedits Runic affinities
215
Harmony between linguistic research and ethnographic tradition in regard to the ancient Etruscans
226
General remarks on the absorption or evanescence of the old Etruscan Language
229
CHAPTER VI
231
Arvalian Litany
232
Chants preserved by Cato
234
Fragments of the Salian Hymns
236
Old Regal Laws
238
Tab X
257
Tab XI
258
Tab XII ib 19 The Tiburtine Inscription
259
The Epitaphs of the Scipios
267
The Columna Rostrata
268
The Silian and Papyrian Laws and the Edict of the Curule jEdiles
269
The SenatusConsultum de Bacchanalibus
270
The Old Roman Law on the Bantine Table
272
The Agrarian Law of 8p Thorius
275
CHAPTER VII
283
The Labials
285
The Gutturals
292
The Dentals
301
The Greek Letters used by the Romans
318
The Numeral Signs
324
CHAPTER VIII
326
General scheme of the caseendings
328
Hypothetical forms of the nominative and accusative plural
330
Existing formsthe Genitive
333
The Dative and Locative
335
The Accusative Singular
336
The Ablative
337
The Neuter Forms
338
The Vocative
339
Adverbs considered as Cases of Nouns
340
CHAPTER IX
347
General rules for the classification of Latin Nouns
348
First or a Declension
349
Second or o Declension
350
Third Declension or consonantal Nouns
352
B Second class or semiconsonantal Nouns
357
PRONOUNS AND PRONOMINAL WORDS 1 General Definitions
367
Indicative Pronouns
371
Distinctive Pronouns
376
Relative Interrogative and Indefinite Pronouns
379
Numerals and Degrees of Comparison
390
Prepositions
394
Negative Particles
403
Tho Latin Verb generally defective
407
Doctrine of the Latin Tenses
410
The Substantive Verbs
411
Paucity of Organic Formations in the regular Latin Verb
417
General Scheme of Tenses in the Latin Verb
418
Verbs which may be regarded as Parathctic Compounds ib 8 Tenses of the Vowelverbs which are combinations of the same kind
420
Organic Derivation of the Tenses in the Consonantverb
422
The Modal Distinctionstheir Syntax
423
Forms of the Infinitive and Participlehow connected in deri vation and meaning
426
The Gebundium and Gerundivum shown to be active and pre sent
428
The Participle in torus
432
The Perfect Subjunctive
433
The Past Tense of tho Infinitive Active
437
The Future of the Infinitive Passive
439
CHAPTER XII
440
The first or a Conjugation
441
The second or e Conjugation
447
The third or i Conjugation
451
The fourth or Consonant Conjugation A Mute Verbs
454
B Liquid Verbs
458
Semiconsonantal Verbs
460
a Irregular Verbs A Additions to tho Present Tense
461
9 B Abbreviated forms
468
Defective Verbs
470
CHAPTER XIII
472
Derivation is merely extended or ulterior inflexion
473
B Composition Discrimination of Compound Words
504
CHAPTER XIV
513
The Poetry of the Augustan age does not represent the genuine
520
The French Language is the best modern representative of
528
But all these Dialects were closely related to the Latin 634
534
Importance and value of the Latin Language 642
542

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Page 531 - Pro Deo amur et pro christian poblo et nostro commun salvament, d'ist di in avant, in quant Deus savir et podir me dunat, si salvarai eo cist meon fradre Karlo, et in...
Page 62 - As we have mentioned Kephalos as the beloved of Eos, and the father of Tithonos, we may add that Kephalos also, like Tithonos and Endymion, was one of the many names of the Sun. Kephalos, however, was the rising Sun — the head of light — an expression frequently used of the sun in different mythologies. In the Veda, where the sun is addressed as a horse, the head of the horse is an expression meaning the rising sun. Thus the poet says, Ev.
Page 480 - Qui autem omnia, quae ad cultum deorum pertinerent, diligenter retractarent et tamquam relegerent, sunt dicti religiosi ex relegendo, ut elegantes ex eligendo, itemque ex diligendo diligentes, ex intelligendo intelligentes.
Page 251 - Occentassint antiqui dicebant quod nunc convitium fecerint dicimus, quod id clare, et cum quodam canore fit, ut procul exaudiri possit. Quod turpe habetur, quia non sine causa fieri putatur.
Page 562 - Independently of the original matter which will be found in almost every page, it is believed that this book presents a collection of known facts respecting the old languages of Italy which will be found in no single work, whether British or foreign, and which must be gleaned from a considerable number of rare and expensive publications ; and while the lists of Oscan and Etruscan glosses, and the...
Page 562 - The enlarged Edition of the Latin Grammar has been prepared with the same object as the corresponding work on the Greek language. It is, however, especially designed to serve as a convenient handbook for those students who wish to acquire the habit of writing Latin ; and with this view it is furnished with an Antibarbarus, with a full discussion of the most important synonyms, and with a variety of information not generally contained in works of this description.
Page 505 - They always ate in gothic halls, at the high table or oreille, (which is a little room at the upper end of the hall, where stands a table,) with the folks at the side-tables.
Page 111 - In fact, heris appears to be the participle of the verb, of which the imperative is heritu (VI. a, 27, &c.). This verb occurs in the Oscan also (Tab. Bantin. 12, &c.). That ocriper (ucriper) Fisiu means "for the Fisian mount" may be demonstrated from Festus, p.
Page 564 - Classical Scholarship and Classical Learning considered with especial reference to Competitive Tests and University Teaching. A Practical Essay on Liberal Education. By the Rev. JW DONALDSON, DD Crown 8vo. 5.
Page 562 - Etruscan glosses, and the reprint of fragments and inscriptions, may render the treatise an indispensable addition to the dictionary, and a convenient manual for the professed student of Latin, it is hoped that the classical traveller in Italy will find the information amassed and arranged in these pages, sufficient to spare him the trouble of carrying with him a voluminous library of reference in regard to the subjects of which it treats.

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