Old Plymouth: a Guide to Its Localities and Objects of Interest

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Avery & Doten, 1881 - Plymouth (Mass.) - 94 pages
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Page 57 - its mansion call the fleeting breath ? Can honor's voice provoke the silent dust, Or flattery soothe the dull, cold ear of death ?" Close around us are the last resting places of many of the first coiners. The marble
Page 55 - its mansion call the fleeting breath ? Can honor's voice provoke the silent dust, Or flattery soothe the dull, cold ear of death ?" Close around us are the last resting places of many of the first
Page 63 - This modest stone, what few vain marbles can, May truly say, Here lies an honest man; Calmly he looked on either life, and here Saw nothing to regret or there to fear; From nature's temperate feast rose satisfied, Thanked Heaven that he had lived and that he died. On the path
Page 62 - 10. On a stone to the memory of Thomas Jackson, died in 1794: The spider's most attenuated thread Is cord, is cable, to man's tender tie. MARTHA COTTON, 1796. - Many years I lived, Many painful scenes I passed, Till God at last Called me home.
Page 66 - Tis a little thing To give a cup of water; yet its draught Of cool refreshment, drained by fevered lips, May give a shock of pleasure to the frame, More exquisite than when
Page 33 - on the further side of the river also much corn ground cleared. In one field is a great hill on which we point to make a platform, and plant our ordnance, which will command all around about. From thence we may see into the bay, and far into the sea ; and we may
Page 43 - The Pilgrim Fathers are at rest: When Summer's throned on high, And the world's warm breast is in verdure dressed Go, stand on the hill where they lie.
Page 41 - with hewn planks, so that their houses and court-yards are arranged in very good order, with a stockade against a sudden attack; and at the ends of the streets are three wooden gates. In the centre, on the cross street, stands the Governor's house, before which is a square enclosure, upon which four patereros
Page 47 - came over the brook, and some twenty men following him, leaving all their bows and arrows behind them. We kept six or seven as hostages for our messenger. Captain Standish and Master Williamson met the King at the brook, with half a dozen musketeers. They saluted him, and he them ; so one going over, the one on
Page 59 - After a life well spent, he's now at rest, His very name and memory is blest. At the grave of another son, the headstone reads as follows: Here lyes interred ye body of Mr. Joseph Bradford, son to the late Honorable William Bradford, Esq., Governor of Plymouth Colony, who departed this life July

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