General Linguistics

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Georgetown University Press, 1995 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 646 pages
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A comprehensive overview of the development of language studies from the ancient Greeks through modern theorists, this book focuses on determining what the enduring issues in linguistics are, what concepts have changed, and why. Francis P. Dinneen, SJ, defines the basic terminology of the discipline as well as different linguistic theories, and he frequently compares underlying assumptions in contemporaneous science and linguistics.

General Linguistics traces the history of linguistics from ancient Greek works on grammar and rhetoric through the medieval roots of traditional grammar and its assumption that there is a norm for correct speech. Dinneen marks the beginning of modern linguistics with Saussure's concept of an autonomous linguistic structure independent of socially imposed norms, and he details the theoretical contributions of Sapir, Bloomfield, Hjelmslev, Chomsky, Pike, and others. Dinneen considers the relative merits of the different theories and models, evaluating their claims and shortcomings.

A thorough introduction to linguistics for newcomers to the field, this book will also be valuable to linguists, psychologists, philosophers, and historians of science for its evaluations of major theoretical concepts in light of enduring issues and problems in language studies.

  

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Contents

Purposes in studying language 9 A simple example
10
Kinds ofmeaning 19 What mean meant 20 Conventions 21
23
A central focus of phonology 35 Phonemics 35 English phonemes
36
Phonemic analysis 47 Segmental phonemes of English 49 Motivated
59
Some Minimal Pairs in American English 63 Reading
77
Language as a system of forms
79
Structural morphology and syntax 90 Function as mean 90 Public
92
Hierarchy 98 Covariation 99 Messages
112
tions Meaning 327 Linguistics Translation Contributions 327 Struc
337
cational Texts 353 The Stratificational Approach 353 Higher
354
each other 360 Stratal Representation 361 Notes 361 Reading
362
vs Absence 369 Phrase Structure 369 PS Constituents are not just
375
Categories and Relations 387 Subcategorization 389 Factors
392
Constants and Variables 403 Languages are Unique 404 Languages
407
Particle Wave Field 420 Reduction 420 Tagmemics and Drama
422
Distribution vs Composition 424 Predicate Types
429

Necessary and Contingent 121 Proposition and Sen
126
Varros definition ofword138 Varros Method 139 Usage
140
Phobias 141 Greek
160
SOSEEMSAID 167 Ways of knowing 168 Knowledge
169
Use of modistic terminology in theology 173 Peter of Spains Summu
183
Etymology and historical linguistics
199
William Jones 212 Etymology and History 213 Reconstruction
214
Changes Change 226 Intervocalic consonants 226 The vocalic
232
Comparative Philology is too narrow 245 Saussure
247
Science explains and predicts 259 Language for linguists 260 Franz
262
Importance of Radicals 269 Form and Meaning Essentials 270 Form
283
Bloomfield on meaning 297 The fundamental assumption of linguis
299
Pattern Design 303 A Priori vs A posteriori 303 Rationalists
305
Bloomfields Conclusions 309 Bloomfields influ
311
Description and Explanation 315 Explaining Language Use
317
Induction and deduction in Malinowski 319 Objectivity 320 John
323
Tentative Lexical Decompositions 442 Reading
444
XBar and Quirks NP VP Analysis 456 Constituents and Non
462
COMP Paradigmatically 476 Abstract identity in concrete difference
477
SubjectRaising 495 Generalizations
496
The intralinguistic relation of GOVERNMENT
510
Argument structure 519 Lexical Entries 520 Interpreting lexical
523
Relational Grammar 533 Signification value
544
TG MG Compared 555 The Nature of Syntac
560
Summary and Conclusions
573
Logical talk about SNP VP 575 Grammatical talk about S
575
view of Language 588 Hispanus terms and nonterms 588 Language
589
and Tokens 602 Traces zeros and empty categories 602 Autonomous
604
Reading 624 Notes
624
Author Index
643
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