The Adventures of Hajji Baba, of Ispahan, in England

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Ward and Lock, 1856 - English fiction - 291 pages
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Page 137 - The mehmandar informed the Mirza Firouz that the number of persons admitted to the shah's presence on this occasion was restricted to a certain few; and therefore it was proposed that neither I nor any of his Persian suite should be of the party. Accordingly we saw him depart, accompanied only by the mehmandar; but we determined to make our way to the scene of action, in order to observe the passage of the royal procession. The whole city was in motion. Never before had we seen such an assemblage...
Page 129 - Among the signs of his power are the night, and the day, and the sun, and the moon. Worship not the sun, neither the moon: but worship God, who hath created them; if ye serve him.
Page 115 - Allum — in a word, the chair and deputy chair (as their interpreter explained himself, pointing first to a chair, and then to a stool, in illustration of his meaning). On further explanation, the strangers learn that, though the personages who visited them, '* possessed kingdoms, they were not in fact kings ; that the revenues of these kingdoms did not belong to them, but to others who enjoyed the fruits of them ; that they were partly concerned in occasionally sending out a king, or firman...
Page 143 - ... the English character we had never before acquired. We Persians, who are so fond of a good saying, were delighted to find that so much merriment could exist among persons who usually live in a fog ; and the ambassador, who thought that there might be some etiquette among them as to who should launch the first joke, seeing that they were in general so taciturn, willingly ventured to break the spell, and never lost an opportunity for the future of putting in his word whenever he could do so with...
Page 116 - ... mute, only occasionally saying, " Allah, Allah ! there is but one Allah ! " so wonderfully astonished were we. What ? India ! that great, that magnificent empire ! — that scene of Persian conquest and Persian glory ! — the land of elephants and precious stones! the seat of shawls and kincobs! — that paradise sung by poets, celebrated by historians, more ancient than Iran itself ! — at whose boundaries the sun is permitted to rise, and around whose majestic mountains, some clad in eternal...
Page 120 - And speak unto the believing women, that they restrain their eyes, and preserve their modesty, and discover not their ornaments, except what necessarily appeareth thereof: and let them throw their veils over their bosoms, and not show their ornaments, unless to their husbands, or their fathers, or their husbands' fathers, or their sons, or their husbands' sons, or their brothers, or their brothers...
Page 128 - I see you are worshipping the fire!" Upon this, Mirza Firouz, in wrath, exclaimed to me, who was standing before him, " What words are these ? He does not know, that if we were worshippers of fire, it would not be the offensive smoky fires of his country.* Even the Guebres, who are scarcely good enough to manure our fields, are scrupulous as to the purity of their fire; what then must we be, who look upon them as the uncleanest of infidels?" Then turning to the mehmandar, he said, " For the love...
Page 69 - It must have been constructed upon the model of the famous peacock throne of the Moguls. Upon four pillars of curiously wrought wood was raised a canopy of rich stuffs, from which were suspended curtains as ample as those which screen the great hall of Tehran. The seat was overlaid with the softest and most luxuriant mattresses, and pillows to recline upon were raised one above the other in heaps.
Page 107 - Ali, amongst its kings, is not accustomed to child's play, and, moreover, is not at all inclined to take example from the kings of Frangistaun for any part of its conduct in matters relating to its own dignity.
Page 116 - Iran itself! — at whose boundaries the sun is permitted to rise, and around whose majestic mountains, some clad in eternal snows, others in eternal verdure, the stars and the moon are allowed to gambol and carouse! What! is it so fallen, so degraded, as to be swayed by two obscure mortals, living in regions that know not the warmth of the sun? Two swine-eating infidels, shaven, impure walkers on foot, and who, by way of state, travel in dirty coaches filled with straw! This seemed to us a greater...

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