A Critical History of the Language and Literature of Ancient Greece

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1850 - Greek language
 

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Page 453 - And it came to pass at noon that Elijah mocked them, and said, Cry aloud : for he is a god ; either he is talking or he is pursuing, or he is in a journey, or peradventure he sleepeth, and must be awaked.
Page 120 - What's Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba, That he should weep for her ? What would he do, Had he the motive and the cue for passion That I have...
Page 276 - And here we part with Achilles at the moment best calculated to exalt and purify our impression of his character. We had accompanied him through the effervescence, undulations, and final subsidence of his stormy passions. We now leave him in repose and under the full influence of the more amiable affections, while our admiration of his great qualities is chastened by the reflection that, within a few short days the mighty being in whom they were united was himself to be suddenly cut off in the full...
Page 346 - He submits in silence to the most cutting reproofs of his noble brother, and cheerfully obeys all his suggestions. It is true, on the other hand, that Hector's remonstrances are directed solely at his want of energy in the field. They never touch on his amorous indulgence, or the duty of reparation for his crime. The proposal of Antenor, to the latter effect, is received in a very different spirit, with the petulant effrontery of the spoiled child and pampered man of pleasure. ' Helen is the female...
Page 244 - ... which Homer is accustomed to work up his subject when fairly embarked on it. As the events succeed each other, so the scene shifts with a rapidity unexampled elsewhere. The arrival of Chryses in the camp, his address to the assembled host, the refusal of his request by Agamemnon, and the acknowledgment of its justice by the troops, his departure and prayer to his patron deity, the descent of the god from Olympus, the ten days' ravages of his weapons, and the funeral rites of the victims, are...
Page 6 - The third, or Attic period, commences with the rise of the Attic drama and of prose literature, and closes with the establishment of the Macedonian ascendancy, and the consequent extinction of republican freedom in Greece.
Page 215 - ... the basis of the modern Homeric theory, were a phenomenon unexampled in historical times, nor consequently admissible, on hypothetical grounds, in the darker periods of art. Throughout the two poems the same deep knowledge of human nature is displayed, in identically the same forms, not merely in the delineation of those more prominent passions or feelings which may sometimes be vigorously apprehended even by inferior artists, but in the penetrating power with which the single great master dives...
Page 218 - ... combination of virtues, failings, and passions, thinking, speaking, acting, and suffering, according to the same single type of heroic grandeur, can be the production of more than a single mind. Such evidence is, perhaps, even stronger in the case of the less prominent actors, in so far as it is...
Page 217 - Homer through the medium of dramatic action, where the characters are never formally described, but made to develope themselves by their own language and conduct. It is this, among his many great qualities, which chiefly raises Homer above all other poets of his own class ; nor, with the single exception perhaps of the great English dramatist, has any poet ever produced so numerous and spirited a variety of original characters, of different ages, ranks, and sexes.
Page 347 - ... her deserted child, and the home of her fathers ; and is as ready to acknowledge and condemn her own faults as to appreciate the opposite virtues of others. The finer touches with ,which her portrait is worked up are all of the more delicate dramatic description. In the emotion she displays at the invitation of ./Eneas to go forth to the ramparts and witness the preparation for the duel between her past and present husband ; in her dignified advance to the admiring old senators ; in her grief...

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