Memoirs of the court of King James the First, Volume 2

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1822 - Great Britain
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Page 185 - Philomel her voice shall raise ? You violets that first appear, By your pure purple mantles known Like the proud virgins of the year, As if the spring were all your own ; What are you when the rose is blown ? So, when my mistress shall be seen In form and beauty of her mind, By virtue first, then choice, a Queen, Tell me, if she were not design'd Th...
Page 292 - ... that the liberties, franchises, privileges, and jurisdictions of parliament are the ancient and undoubted birthright and inheritance of the subjects of England; and that the arduous and urgent affairs concerning the king, state, and defence of the realm and of the church of England, and the maintenance and making of laws, and redress of mischiefs and grievances which daily happen within this realm are proper subjects and matter of counsel and debate in parliament...
Page 213 - it is my act, my hand, my heart. I beseech your Lordships to be merciful to a broken reed.
Page 12 - God's sake let me, said the King, shall I, shall I? Then lolled about his neck: then for God's sake give thy lady this kiss for me...
Page 138 - Paris, in 1625, he had twenty-seven suits of clothes made, the richest that embroidery, lace, silk, velvet, gold, and gems, could contribute; one of which was a white uncut velvet, set all over, both suit and cloak, with diamonds valued at fourscore thousand pounds, besides a great feather, stuck all over with diamonds; as were also his sword, girdle, hat-band, and spurs.
Page 38 - ... my opinion is plainly that my lord Coke at this time is not to be disgraced ; both because he is so well habituate for that which remaineth of these capital causes, and also for that which I find is in his breast touching your finances and matters of repair of your estate...
Page 223 - My conceit of his person' - it is Ben Jonson speaking of Lord Bacon 'was never increased towards him by his place or honours. But I have and do reverence him for the greatness that was only proper to himself; in that he seemed to me ever one of the greatest men that had been in many ages. In his adversity I ever prayed that Heaven would give him strength; for greatness he could not want.
Page 184 - You meaner beauties of the night, That poorly satisfy our eyes More by your number than your light, You common people of the skies; What are you when the moon shall rise?
Page 79 - ... men's necks with a Jewish yoke, against the liberty of Christians ; that Christ, as Lord of the Sabbath, had removed the rigour thereof, and allowed men lawful recreations ; that this doctrine put an unequal lustre on the Sunday, on set purpose to eclipse all other holy days, to the derogation of the authority of the church ; that this strict observance was set up out of faction, to be a character of difference to brand all for libertines who did not entertain it.
Page 154 - That which concerns the mystery of the King's power is not lawful to be disputed, for that is to wade into the weakness of Princes and to take away the mystical reverence that belongs unto them that sit in the throne of God.

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