Mercy in Her Eyes: The Films of Mira Nair

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Hal Leonard Corporation, 2006 - Performing Arts - 290 pages
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A unique voice in cinema today, Mira Nair's films feature an incomparably sensuous visual style yet at the same time record the injustice of the disenfranchised and the cross-pollination of East and West. Her twin themes of realism and romance make for dazzling cinema as evidenced in: Salaam Bombay! (1988); Mississippi Masala (1991); The Perez Family (1993); Kama Sutra (1996); My Own Country (1998); Monsoon Wedding (2001); Hysterical Blindness (2002); Vanity Fair (2004); and The Namesake (releasing 2006). Muir analyses all of Nair's work, including her documentaries.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - astasin - LibraryThing

This was an interesting book for those who would like more detail about Mira Nair's work up to The Namesake. However, I felt the structure of the book was very apparent. The author combined interviews ... Read full review

Mercy in Her Eyes: The Films of Mira Nair

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

During the 1950s, India became a forerunner in feature film output, and it was in that decade and country that filmmaker Mira Nair (Monsoon Wedding ) was born. Muir (Best in Show: The Films of ... Read full review

Contents

Mahurat The Auspicious Beginning of Mira Nairs Career in Film
17
Salaam Bombay 1988
33
Mississippi Masala 1991 and The Perez Family 1995
71
Kama Sutra A Tale of Love 1997 My Own Country 1998 and The Laughing Club of India 1999
107
Monsoon Wedding 2002 Hysterical Blindness 2002 110901 2002 and Vanity Fair 2004
159
Sneak Peek The Namesake 2006
231
A Conclusion to Mercy in Her Eyes
239
You Know Youre in a Mira Nair Film When You See
245
NOTES
251
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
261
INDEX
271
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Page xi - I have become a queer mixture of the East and West, out of place everywhere, at home nowhere. Perhaps my thoughts and approach to life are more akin to what is called Western than Eastern, but India clings to me, as she does to all her children in innumerable ways...
Page 14 - ... left Ghana, and historical circumstances can change. I have since written one rather amateurish book of literary criticism on contemporary Nigerian writing, Long Drums and Cannons, and have met, on several occasions, the Nigerian novelist Chinua Achebe. Knowing that, in our different ways, Achebe and I have been trying to do much the same sort of thing all our writing lives, I recognized that communication could be possible. (Dance 153...

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