A Treatise on Rheumatic Gout, Or Chronic Rheumatic Arthritis of All the Joints

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Churchill, 1873 - Rheumatoid arthritis - 568 pages
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Page 299 - Although the opportunities of examining the pathological condition of joints which are affected in this manner are only of occasional occurrence, there is no surgeon of much experience who has not seen many cases of the same disease in the living person, or who, having seen them, will not assent to the correctness of the observation which I have already made, that inflammation of the synovial membrane is the first of the series of changes which the joint undergoes. This is clearly indicated by the...
Page 7 - It may also be a constitutional, or simply a local disorder. Thus, Dr. Robert Adams remarks that, " when we observe it affecting all the joints in the same individual on both sides symmetrically, we may feel assured that the chronic articular affection in such a case has proceeded from some deep constitutional taint. In the majority of such cases we shall, I believe, discover that the general chronic affection has been immediately preceded by an attack of rheumatic fever, from the lingering remains...
Page 22 - The gout attacks the patient in paroxysms of a few days, weeks, or months, and has complete intermissions, at first for years, but afterwards for shorter periods. The gout attacks men much more frequently than women. There is one distressful circumstance which distinguishes...
Page 550 - In the two cases to which I allude this preternatural growth of bone had taken place, and in consequence of the motion of the parts on each other, portions of it had been broken off and lay loose in the cavity of the joint.
Page 37 - II. 77. shape, with one surface smooth and cartilaginous, and the other surface having a thin layer of bone adhering to it, being evidently a portion of the articular surface actually broken off from the head of the tibia. That such an accident should occasionally happen from any sudden or violent motion of the joint, with a hard body loose in its cavity, is no more than might reasonably be expected.
Page 303 - ... being affected, that she lay almost helpless on a sofa, and various methods of treatment having been already employed to no purpose), having learned that cod-liver oil had been formerly supposed to be useful in some forms of rheumatism, I was tempted to prescribe this remedy for her. The purified oil was administered internally, and at the same time rubbed in as a liniment on the affected joints. It was a mere experiment ; but there is certainly great reason to believe that it was not altogether...
Page 142 - Unusually active means were required to subdue the inflammation, and, at the end of three weeks, though the swelling was much reduced, the tenderness in front of the joint, and pain on certain movements of the limb, were scarcely less than on the day after the occurrence of the accident. On comparing the joint with its fellow, now that the swelling had subsided, a marked difference was observable between their respective outlines ; the injured shoulder was evidently out of drawing, but without presenting...
Page 203 - January, 1839, she was admitted into St. George's Hospital, under the care of Dr. Chambers.
Page 15 - ... before it reaches what may be regarded as its most advanced stage. Throughout the whole of its course, it causes no severe pain, but there are constant uneasy sensations, and much distress and inconvenience, in consequence of the joints becoming gradually more rigid and unfit for use. The patient, in addition to his local ailments, always suffers, in a greater or less degree, from the usual effects of dyspepsia, which are aggravated by want of exercise. He is liable to acidity of the stomach,...
Page 120 - ... the anterior part of the neck of the scapula, which was hollowed, and formed the lower portion of the glenoid cavity. The natural rounded form of the head of the bone was much altered, it having become irregularly oviform, with its long axis from above downwards ; a small portion of the original glenoid cavity remained, but this was rendered irregular on its surface by the deposition of cartilage. There were also many particles of cartilaginous matter upon...

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