Mammals of the Neotropics, Volume 2: The Southern Cone: Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay

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University of Chicago Press, Apr 15, 1992 - Medical - 460 pages
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Mammals of the Neotropics satisfies the need for a comprehensive, up-to-date survey of existing knowledge of South America's terrestrial and marine mammals. No comparable account of South American mammals has ever been published in any language, and this timely work will help encourage the research vital to conservation efforts.

This second of a projected three volumes covers southern South America. The authors discuss the historical biogeography and contemporary habitats of the region and then
provide individual accounts for nearly 360 indigenous species, including information on size, appearance, ecology, behavior, and life history. Range maps, line drawings, and color plates supplement the text. To place the species accounts in a broader context, the authors consider the diversity of animals within each taxonomic group, examine the Neotropical species from a worldwide geographical perspective, and review taxonomic questions and
controversies. Two final chapters deal with the community ecology of mammals and the effects humans have had on the mammalian fauna of the southern cone.

 

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Contents

Acknowledgments
1
Order Marsupialia
14
Order Xenarthra Edentata
46
Order Chiroptera
69
Order Primates
134
Order Pinnipedia
179
Order Perissodactyla
226
Southern South America
407
Fauna of Southern South America
420
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Page 419 - Lyell, few countries have undergone more remarkable changes since the year 1535, when the first colonist of La Plata landed with seventy-two horses. The countless herds of horses, cattle, and sheep, not only have altered the whole aspect of the vegetation, but they have almost banished the guanaco, deer, and ostrich.
Page 419 - ... seventy-two horses. The countless herds of horses, cattle, and sheep, not only have altered the whole aspect of the vegetation, but they have almost banished the guanaco, deer, and ostrich. Numberless other changes must likewise have taken place; the wild pig in some parts probably replaces the peccari; packs of wild dogs may be heard howling on the wooded banks of the less frequented streams; and the common cat, altered into a large and fierce animal, inhabits rocky hills.

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About the author (1992)

Kent H. Redford is coeditor, with John G. Robinson, of Neotropical Wildlife Use and Conservation, published by the University of Chicago Press. John F. Eisenberg is the
author of Mammals of the Neotropics, volume 1: The Northern Neotropics, and The Mammalian Radiations, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

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