Protestant Theology in the Nineteenth Century (Google eBook)

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Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, Jul 17, 2002 - Religion - 652 pages
1 Review
Introduction by Colin E. Gunton

Interest in Karl Barth is running at unprecedented levels in the English-speaking world, and it is high time that his excellent survey of formative eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Protestant thinkers be made available again to theological students and general readers.

Featuring an extensive introduction by Colin E. Gunton that recontextualizes and reintroduces Barth's work for a new generation, this book provides a superb review of the shapers of modern Protestant thought and practice. Barth offers insightful readings of all the most significant figures of the modern period -- Rousseau, Lessing, Kant, Hegel, Schleiermacher, Feuerbach, Ritschl, and others -- as well as several lesser-known thinkers. Also included here are Barth's preface to the original 1946 German edition and a translation of his hard-to-find essay "On the Task of a History of Modern Protestant Theology."

In addition to providing insight into some of the church's seminal theologians, this volume offers an excellent look at Barth himself. In capturing Barth's personal views on doctrine, the church, and intellectual history, the book also provides valuable background reading for those studying Barth's own theology.
  

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Review: Protestant Theology in the Nineteenth Century

User Review  - Robert Kwik - Christianbook.com

Karl Barth, as usual covers the subject in depth. I now shall be reading his wisdom and seeking to inwardly digest this amazing intellect.At less than 10% of the book I give it 5 stars for having done much more than other completely digested books. Read full review

Contents

IV
1
V
17
VI
19
VII
66
VIII
122
IX
160
X
220
XI
252
XXI
494
XXII
505
XXIII
520
XXIV
527
XXV
555
XXVI
563
XXVII
574
XXVIII
583

XII
299
XIII
327
XIV
370
XV
409
XVI
411
XVII
460
XVIII
468
XIX
477
XX
485
XXIX
593
XXX
602
XXXI
611
XXXII
620
XXXIII
629
XXXIV
640
XXXV
648
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Page 22 - Absolutism' in general can obviously mean a system of life based upon the belief in the omnipotence of human powers. Man, who discovers his own power and ability, the potentiality dormant in his humanity, that is, his human being as such, and looks upon it as the final, the real and absolute, I mean as something 'detached...

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About the author (2002)

(1886 1968) Karl Barth was professor of dogmatic theology at the University of Basel, Switzerland. He is considered by some to be the greatest Protestant theologian of the twentieth century and possibly the greatest since the Reformation. Among his most famous works are Church Dogmatics and The Epistle to the Romans.

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