The Business of Children's Entertainment

Front Cover
Guilford Press, Mar 6, 2002 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 190 pages
For the past 20 years, toy manufacturers have subsidized the development of children's television programming. The result has been the increased commercialization of children's popular culture; the creation of a "material world" of childhood characterized by brand-name toys, games, clothing, and television characters. Drawing upon historical and economic data and case studies of the media marketplace, this book examines how children have been developed into both an audience and a consumer group.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Children Become Consumers
7
Children Become Audiences
24
The Industries Television and Toy
40
Case Studies Smurfs and HeMan and ThunderCats
60
Alternatives
81
The Media Marketplace
111
International Expansion
133
Consequences
152
Notes
159
References
167
Index
183
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Norma Odom Pecora, PhD, teaches in the School of Telecommunications at Ohio University. Her areas of interest include issues of gender and childhood; topics that inform the courses she teaches and her research work. She is currently working on the contribution of popular culture to the construction of identity in young girls.