Adventures among books

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Longmans, Green, 1905 - Literary Criticism - 312 pages
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Page 270 - And slowly rolled her eyes around; Then drawing in her breath aloud, Like one that shuddered, she unbound The cincture from beneath her breast: Her silken robe, and inner vest, Dropt to her feet, and full in view, Behold! her bosom and half her side A sight to dream of, not to tell!
Page 135 - With hue like that when some great painter dips His pencil in the gloom of earthquake and eclipse.
Page 9 - The stag at eve had drunk his fill, Where danced the moon on Monan's rill, And deep his midnight lair had made In lone Glenartney's hazel shade...
Page 21 - MORTE D'ARTHUR. So all day long the noise of battle roll'd Among the mountains by the winter sea; Until King Arthur's table, man by man, Had fallen in Lyonnesse about their Lord, King Arthur: then, because his wound was deep, The bold Sir Bedivere uplifted him, Sir Bedivere the last of all his knights, And bore him to a chapel nigh the field, A broken chancel with a broken cross, That stood on a dark strait of barren land. On one side lay the Ocean...
Page 271 - I am sorry that Coleridge has christened his Ancient Marinere 'a poet's Reverie' - it is as bad as Bottom the Weaver's declaration that he is not a Lion .but only the scenical representation of a Lion. What new idea is gained by this Title, but one subversive of all credit, which the tale should force upon us, of its truth? For me, I was never so affected with any human Tale. After first reading it, I was totally possessed with it for many days...
Page 63 - I ever knew was upon the death of my father, at which time I was not quite five years of age; but was rather amazed at what all the house meant, than possessed with a real understanding -why nobody was willing to play with me.
Page 107 - Thatmaketh me both deaf and blind, Careless to win, unskilled to find, And quick to lose what all men seek. Yet tottering as I am and weak, Still have I left a little breath To seek within the jaws of death An entrance to that happy...
Page 65 - High School, our heads together, and our arms intertwisted, as only lovers and boys know how, or why. When we got to the top of the street, and turned north, we espied a crowd at the Tron Church. "A dog-fight!" shouted Bob, and was off; and so was I, both of us all but praying that it might not be over before we got up ! And is not this boy-nature ? and human nature too ? and don't we all wish a house...
Page 302 - English so well that he was taught Latin at three years of age, and at four read Greek with an ease and fluency which astonished all who heard him.
Page 8 - THE Baron of Smaylho'me rose with day, He spurred his courser on, Without stop or stay, down the rocky way, That leads to Brotherstone. He went not with the bold Buccleuch, His banner broad to rear; He went not 'gainst the English yew, To lift the Scottish spear. Yet his plate-jack* was braced, and his helmet was laced, And his vaunt-brace of proof he wore; At his saddle-gerthe was a good steel sperthe, Full ten pound weight and...

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