Elementary Number Theory and Its Applications

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Addison-Wesley, 2000 - Nombres, Théorie des - 638 pages
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The fourth edition of Kenneth Rosen's widely used and successful text, Elementary Number Theory and Its Applications, preserves the strengths of the previous editions, while enhancing the book's flexibility and depth of content coverage.The blending of classical theory with modern applications is a hallmark feature of the text. The Fourth Edition builds on this strength with new examples, additional applications and increased cryptology coverage. Up-to-date information on the latest discoveries is included.Elementary Number Theory and Its Applications provides a diverse group of exercises, including basic exercises designed to help students develop skills, challenging exercises and computer projects. In addition to years of use and professor feedback, the fourth edition of this text has been thoroughly accuracy checked to ensure the quality of the mathematical content and the exercises.

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Try working problems 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 20, 23, 25, 27, 28, 29, 33, 34, 44 and 45 of section 1.1 from the sketchy exposition provided.
Try working problems 5, 10, 14, 15, 16, 17, 21, 22, 23, and
24 from the sketchy exposition provided.in section 1.2
Try working out the proofs of Bertrand's Conjecture and Bonse's Inequality, topics which deserve their own exposition, asked for in the problems for Section 3.2.
Try understanding the least remainder theorem which deserves its own exposition, but instead is relegated to problems 14-18 of Section 3.4, much less working the problems themselves.
Problems 10-25 of Section 3.4 or over half are unworkable from the exposition!!!!!
Problems 19-42 of Section 7.5 cannot be worked from the exposition.
This is only the tip of the iceberg.
In addition numerous answers in the back of the book are completely unintelligible.
Rosen has gone out of his way to transmogrify an interesting subject into a nightmare of incomprehensibility and frustration and managed to collect royalties for it. I don't know who is more despicable, Rosen or the reviewers on this thread who are obviously lying through their teeth about this book.
 

Contents

What is Number Theory?
1
Integer Representations and Operations
39
Primes and Greatest Common Divisors
65
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Ken Rosen (Middletown, NJ) is a distinguished member of the technical staff at AT & T Labs.

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