A Woman's Philosophy of Woman; Or, Woman Affranchised: An Answer to Michelet, Proudhon, Girardin, Legouvé, Comte, and Other Modern Innovators

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In response to anti-feminists like Michelet and Comte, a well respected French physician and thinker presents her views on women's rights.
 

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Page 319 - POSTAGE FREE, to any part of the United States. This convenient and very safe mode may be adopted when the neighboring Booksellers are not supplied with the desired work. State name and address in full.
Page 322 - Charles Reade. THE CLOISTER AND THE HEARTH. — A magnificent new novel — the best this author ever wrote. . . 8vo. cloth, $2.00 The Opera. TALES FROM THE OPERAS. — A collection of clever stories, based upon the plots of all the famous operas. I2mo. cloth, $1.50 Robert B.
Page 22 - All our vigorous peasant women, our robust laundresses, who stand the whole time with their feet in water, our workwomen, our tradeswomen, our teachers, our servant-maids, who attend with alacrity to their business and pleasures, experience no uncomfortableness, or at most, very little. Michelet, therefore, has not only erred in erecting a physiological law into a morbid condition, but he has also sinned against rational method by making general rules of a few exceptions, and by proceeding from this...
Page 114 - To sum up: liberty is an absolute right, because it is to man what impenetrability is; to matter, — a sine qua non of existence; equality is an absolute right, because without equality there is no society; security is an absolute right, because in the eyes of every man his own liberty and life are as precious as another's. These three rights are absolute; that is, susceptible of neither increase nor...
Page 316 - ... possibility ? What are we to do ? You are to establish a journal to maintain your claims. You are to appoint an encyclopedic committee to draw up a series of treatises on the principal branches of human knowledge for the enlightenment of women and the people. You are to found a Polytechnic Institute for women. You are to aid your sisters of the laboring classes to organize themselves in trades associations on economical principles more equitable than those of the present time. You are to facilitate...
Page 39 - I am a woman — I glory in it; I rejoice if any value is set upon me, not for myself, indeed, but because this contributes to modify the opinion of men with respect to my sex. A woman who is happy upon hearing it said: "You are a...
Page 17 - Woman, according to Michelet, is a being of a nature opposite to that of man; a creature weak, always wounded, exceedingly barometrical, and, consequently, unfit for labor. She is incapable of abstracting, of generalizing, of comprehending conscientious labors. She does not like to occupy herself with business, and she is destitute, in part, of judicial sense. But, in return, she is revealed all gentleness, all love, all grace, all devotion.
Page 20 - ... him as the work to the workman, as the vessel to the potter. The book of Michelet and the two studies of Proudhon on woman, are but two forms of the same ^thought. The sole difference that exists between these gentlemen is, that the first is as sweet as honey, and the second as bitter as wormwood. Nevertheless, I prefer the rude assailant to the poet ; for insults and blows rouse us to rebel and to clamor for liberty, while compliments lull us to sleep and make us weakly endure our chains. It...
Page 29 - ... moving thing under the vast horizon, you have shut yourself up in a narrow valley, where, seeing nothing but pale violets, you have concluded that every flower must be also a pale violet ; whilst Nature has created a thousand other species, on the contrary, strong and vigorous, with a right, like you, to earth, air, water and sunshine. Whatever may be your love, your kindness and your good intentions towards woman, your book would be immensely dangerous to the cause of her liberty...
Page 39 - You are a man," (sic), is, in my eyes, a simpleton, an unworthy creature, avowing the superiority of the masculine sex; and the men who think that they compliment her in this manner are vainglorious and impertinent boasters. If I acquire any honor, I thus pay honor to women. I reveal their aptitudes. I do not pass into the other sex any more than Proudhon abandons his own, because he is elevated by his intellect above the level of foolish and ignorant men; and if the ignorance of the mass of men...

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