What It Means to Be 98% Chimpanzee: Apes, People, and Their Genes

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University of California Press, Nov 1, 2003 - Science - 336 pages
3 Reviews
Marks presents the field of molecular anthropology—a synthesis of the holistic approach of anthropology with the reductive approach of molecular genetics—as a way of improving our understanding of the science of human evolution. This iconoclastic, witty, and extremely readable book illuminates the deep background of our place in nature and asks us to think critically about what science is, and what passes for it, in modern society.

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User Review  - quantum_flapdoodle - LibraryThing

Certainly not the best book written on this topic - in fact, probably not in the top 500. The author writes reasonably well, but he just isn't compelling, and some of his conclusions are questionable. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Devil_llama - LibraryThing

Certainly not the best book written on this topic - in fact, probably not in the top 500. The author writes reasonably well, but he just isn't compelling, and some of his conclusions are questionable. Read full review

Contents

THE APE IN YOU
32
HOW PEOPLE DIFFER FROM ONE ANOTHER
51
THE MEANING OF HUMAN VARIATION
72
BEHAVIORAL GENETICS
100
FOLK HEREDITY
128
HUMAN NATURE
159
HUMAN RIGHTS FOR APES?
180
A HUMAN GENE MUSEUM?
198
IDENTITY AND DESCENT
219
IS BLOOD REALLY SO DAMN THICK?
242
SCIENCE RELIGION AND WORLDVIEW
266
NOTES AND SOURCES
289
INDEX
303
Copyright

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Page 260 - State, to teach any theory that denies the story of the Divine Creation of man as taught in the Bible, and to teach instead that man has descended from a lower order of animals.
Page 19 - His bodie is full of haire, but not very thicke ; and it is of a dunnish colour. " He differeth not from a man but in his legs ; for they have no calfe.
Page 298 - ... maybe it isn't just the careless use of the word when people call certain areas of certain cities jungles, that we may have gone back to what might be more natural, without all of the social controls that we have imposed upon ourselves as a civilization over thousands of years in our own evolution.
Page 166 - Let us understand, once for all, that the ethical progress of society depends, not on imitating the cosmic process, still less in running away from it, but in combating it.
Page 19 - The People of the Countrie, when they travaile in the Woods, make fires where they sleepe in the night; and in the morning, when they are gone, the Pongoes will come and sit about the fire, til it goeth out: for they have no understanding to lay the wood together.
Page 287 - In a universe of blind physical forces and genetic replication, some people are going to get hurt, other people are going to get lucky, and you won't find any rhyme or reason in it, nor any justice. The universe we observe has precisely the properties we should expect if there is, at bottom, no design, no purpose, no evil and no good, nothing but blind, pitiless indifference.
Page 59 - We find five Sorts of Men; the White Men, which are 'Europeans, that have Beards; and a sort of White Men in America (as I am told) that only differ from us in having no Beards.
Page 214 - The duty and responsibility for ascertaining the quality of the consent rests upon each individual who initiates, directs or engages in the experiment. It is a personal duty and responsibility which may not be delegated to another with impunity.
Page 19 - ... roaring away from them. Those Pongoes are never taken alive because they are so strong, that ten men cannot hold one of them ; but *yet they take many of their young ones with poisoned arrowes.
Page 19 - Pongo hangeth on his mother's belly with his hands fast clasped about her, so that when the countrie people kill any of the females they take the young one, which hangeth fast upon his mother. " When they die among themselves, they cover the dead with great heaps of boughs and wood, which is commonly found in the forest.

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About the author (2003)

Jonathan Marks teaches at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. He is the author of Human Biodiversity: Genes, Race, and History (1995) and coauthor, with Edward Staski, of Evolutionary Anthropology (1992).

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