Reviews

User reviews

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I love this book and the movie!

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Amazing (from a longtime fan of the movie)
I've always loved the movie, but was afraid that the book wouldn't hold up to my expectations (I had heard that they were quite different, and to some degree
, they are). What I found was that they are both amazing for different reasons; I feel that I now have a deeper understanding of the story, and the movie is just a little bit sweeter than it was before... and the book, simply amazing. See the movie, read the book, repeat. You will not be disappointed. 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

The “Princess” is Buttercup, a beautiful young girl who lives with her parents on a farm in the fictitious country of Florin, where old Lotharon and Bella are King and Queen. She falls in love with her family’s “Farm Boy” named Westley, who also adores her. He then leaves to seek his fortune in America so they can marry, but she later receives word that his ship is attacked at sea by the Dread Pirate Roberts and assumes that Westley is dead. After several years, Buttercup agrees to marry the evil Prince Humperdinck, the heir to the throne of Florin. But before the wedding, Buttercup is kidnapped by a trio of outlaws, the Sicilian criminal genius Vizzini, the Spanish fencing master Inigo Montoya, and the giant Turkish wrestler Fezzik. However, a masked “Man in Black” follows them up the Cliffs of Insanity. In the ensuing battles, Inigo and Fezzik are defeated and Vizzini is killed. But why was Buttercup kidnapped in the first place? Who is this mysterious “Man in Black” and what are his plans? And will the Prince ever find Buttercup to marry her?
This fantasy novel, combining elements of comedy, adventure, romance, satire, and fairy tale, is said to be a spoof of swashbuckler movies. Author William Goldman is primarily a Hollywood screenwriter who is best known for Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and All the President’s Men. Several years ago, some friends of ours brought us the 1987 film by Rob Reiner that is based on the book, and except for one little scene through which they fast forwarded, I think because of the language, we enjoyed the movie, and I have always wanted to read the book. The plot of the novel is sometimes a little confusing with all the flashbacks, sub-plots, and Goldman's "commentary" asides. In this respect, the movie is perhaps a little easier to understand than the book because the former follows the action more directly. It would appear that Goldman is a much better screenwriter than he is a novelist. The Princess Bride is presented as Goldman's abridgment of an older version by "S. Morgenstern", which was originally supposed to be a satire of the excesses of European royalty but is in fact entirely Goldman's work. Both Morgenstern and the "original version" are fictional and used as a literary device. Goldman's personal life, as described in the introduction and commentary of the novel, is also fictional.
The basic theme of the book seems to be that “life isn’t fair,” and the narrative sometimes tends towards “absurdism,” a form of literature which has never really interested me. There is a great deal of bad language in the book, more than I remember in the film, with cursing (the “h” and “d” words appear occasionally), profanity (the terms God and Jesus are frequently used as interjections), and assorted crudities (such as calling someone an a**hole and a “son of a b****, as well as even using the “s” word once—by a kid, no less). I guess that it doesn’t surprise me that a modern Hollywood screenwriter would do this and somehow consider his work as “a traditional piece of children’s literature.” Uh, I’m sorry, but I cannot recommend the book for children. In addition to the language, there are scenes of heavy drinking and drunkenness, and at least a couple of threats of suicide. Children can read about how “life isn’t fair” without all that baggage. The latest edition also contains the purported abridgement of the first chapter of the sequel, Buttercup’s Baby. At the end are some “Questions and topics for discussion,” but honestly, even though there is an interesting story hidden in there somewhere, I really don’t see anything that is actually worth discussing.
 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

A Grown Up Fairy Tale
Lauded by many as one of their all time favorite novels, Goldman's epic adventure is sandwiched between the author's own recollections of his father reading it to him and
references to the original Princess Bride by Morgenstern. Not too far into the plot I began to wonder if our author was playing with us & fabricating elements of the story (is that even possible in a novel)& I came to the conclusion that if you want to know the answer to my hypothesis you need to read the book yourself. Suffice to say, Goldman's tale is enchanting, magical, silly & tongue-in-cheek in the same breath. It is difficult to take any of the situations, conflicts, characters or allusions to historical reality as anything more than entertaining whimsical sketches. Indeed, it is a grand fairy tale that can be appreciated by both kids & adults who wish they were kids again.  

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This book is one of my favorite books of all time it even beats Harry Potter in my opinion!
:-) :-D :) :D

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This is one my favorite books of all time. I don't really care about all those "exciting" descriptions that I'm getting terribly sick of. This is a good book. The end.

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This was an amazing book! I loved the high adventure and how Inigo can find his vengeance on his father's killer. The romance with the man in black and buttercup grows rapidly to an extent that grew so fast! I loved the writing of this book... this book shall not "go down with the tide!" 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This is one of my favorite books. Its snarky and gritty, romantic and sarcastic - All of the things I love in a novel. Also, when I read it in college it made me cry - like a hungry, angry baby - in the middle of the hallway. I re-read this book every once in a while and every single time I am reminded why it is a favorite. As a bonus - anyone who loves wordplay will love all of the "interruptions." 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Better than the movie. This story is a mix between legend and truth in its purest form.

Review: The Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure

User Review  - Ashley - Goodreads

I loved getting into Fezzit's head. There was always something about this giant that I always liked and learning his back story was fun. Um... I like the story. It's just this side of weird and ... Read full review

User ratings

5 stars
92
4 stars
44
3 stars
30
2 stars
7
1 star
1

All reviews - 141
5 stars - 63
4 stars - 37
3 stars - 28
1 star - 1

All reviews - 141
Editorial reviews - 0

All reviews - 141
Goodreads - 122
weRead - 1