The Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure

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Harcourt, 2007 - Fiction - 456 pages
1492 Reviews

William Goldman's modern fantasy classic is a simple, exceptional story about quests—for riches, revenge, power, and, of course, true love—that's thrilling and timeless.

 

Anyone who lived through the 1980s may find it impossible—inconceivable, even—to equate The Princess Bride with anything other than the sweet, celluloid romance of Westley and Buttercup, but the film is only a fraction of the ingenious storytelling you'll find in these pages. Rich in character and satire, the novel is set in 1941 and framed cleverly as an “abridged” retelling of a centuries-old tale set in the fabled country of Florin that's home to “Beasts of all natures and descriptions. Pain. Death. Brave men. Coward men. Strongest men. Chases. Escapes. Lies. Truths. Passions.”

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Magnificent writing. - Goodreads
Ok, but the ending was vague and unsatisfying. - Goodreads
A classic love story filled with humour. - Goodreads
The plot is amazing. - Goodreads
Matt was bothered by the introduction. - Goodreads
It was enjoyable but I wanted a far better ending. - Goodreads

Review: The Princess Bride

User Review  - Emily - Goodreads

I originally saw the movie and decided to try the book. It was even better than I could have imagined. Every bit of it is intense, funny, well paced, romantic, and adventurous. A true classic in the ... Read full review

Review: The Princess Bride

User Review  - Briana - Goodreads

I don't know why I didn't write a review when I read this book, but all I know is I absolutely love this book!! Read full review

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About the author (2007)

William Goldman, August 12, 1931 - William Goldman was born August 12, 1931 in Highland Park, Illinois. He attended Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio and then went on to Columbia University in New York. He began his writing career in 1957 and wrote his first screenplay, "Masquerade" in 1965. During an interim job teaching creative writing at Princeton University, Goldman wrote the screenplay for "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid." In 1973, he wrote "The Princess Bride," the only novel he ever wrote that he actually liked, and later adapted it for the screen. Goldman adapted three screenplays form his own novels, the other two titled "Marathon Man" in 1976 and "Heat" in 1978. He is the author of three novels about show biz, which tell the true story of making a living in Hollywood. They are "Adventures in the Screen Trade," "Hype and Glory" and the latest, "Which Lie Did I Tell," printed in 2000. Goldman has written over 20 novels as well as more than 20 major motion picture screenplays over the course of 45 plus years in the business. He has won three Lifetime Achievement Awards for Screenwriting, including the 1985 Laurel Award for Lifetime Achievement in Screenwriter. He has also won tow Screenwriter of the Year Awards and two Academy Awards, one for "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" and the other for "All the President's Men." He even managed to win an English Academy Award. Goldman has written under many pseudonyms during his career, but the two he is best known for are S. Morgenstern, for "The Princess Bride" and Harry Langlaugh, the name of Cassidy in "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.

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