Now, Voyager

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Feminist Press at CUNY, 2004 - Fiction - 284 pages
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?Don't let's ask for the moon! We have the stars!” The film that concludes with Bette Davis's famous words, reaffirmed Davis's own stardom and changed the way Americans smoked cigarettes. But few contemporary fans of this story of a woman's self-realization know its source. Olive Higgins Prouty's 1941 novel Now, Voyager provides an even richer, deeper portrait of the inner life of its protagonist and the society she inhabits. Viewed from a distance of more than 60 years, it also offers fresh and quietly radical takes on psychiatric treatment, traditional family life, female desire, and women's agency.

Boston blueblood Charlotte Vale has led an unhappy, sheltered life. Lonely, dowdy, repressed, and pushing 40, Charlotte finds salvation at a sanitarium, where she undergoes an emotional and physical transformation. After her extreme makeover, the new Charlotte tests her mettle by embarking on a cruise?and finds herself in a torrid love affair with a married man which ends at the conclusion of the voyage. But only then can the real journey begin, as Charlotte is forced to navigate a new life for herself. While Now, Voyager is a tear-jerking romance, it is at the same time the empowering story of a woman who finds the strength to chart her own course in life; who discovers love, sex, and even motherhood outside of marriage; and who learns that men are, ultimately, dispensable in the quest for happiness and fulfillment.

Olive Higgins Prouty (1882?1974), like many of her characters a wealthy Bostonian, was the author of ten novels, including Stella Dallas (1923), which became the basis for three films and a long-running radio serial. A graduate of Smith College, Prouty endowed a writer's scholarship at Smith that was received by Sylvia Plath, who later portrayed her patron unflatteringly in The Bell Jar.

Femmes Fatales restores to print the best of women's writing in the classic pulp genres of the mid-20th century. From mystery to hard-boiled noir to taboo lesbian romance, these rediscovered queens of pulp offer subversive perspectives on a turbulent era. Enjoy the series: Bedelia; The Blackbirder; Bunny Lake Is Missing; By Cecile; The G-String Murders; The Girls in 3-B; In a Lonely Place; Laura; Mother Finds a Body; Now, Voyager; Skyscraper; Stranger on Lesbos; Women's Barracks.



 

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classic movie

User Review  - niki732 - Overstock.com

This is my favorite movie and I wanted to have it so I could watch at any time. When it is on the TV I watch also but if it has commercials I turn it off and watch my own movie. Read full review

Now, Voyager (Femmes Fatales: Women Write Pulp)

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Feminist Press dishes up two more volumes in its "Femme Fatales: Women Write Pulp" series. Released in 1957, the hardboiled Bunny Lake finds mother Blanche searching for her missing daughter, while ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

THE STRANGER
1
LIKE CINDERELLA
10
A SECRET SHARED
19
MUTUAL RESPONSE
27
WHAT OUR MEMORIES ARE
37
THE BRIGHT MORNING
46
BIOGRAPHICAL DETAILS
57
BLOSSOMING OUT
66
A REMINDER OF JOY
139
A REBEL INDEED
148
A LUCKY BREAK FOR CHARLOTTE
155
A GIRLHOOD FRIEND
162
A QUESTION OF TABOOS
172
JD AGAIN
181
AN UGLY WORD
188
THE KNELL OF FOREVER
194

NOT TO BE HARNESSED
78
THE TWO CRUS0ES
87
A FLIRTATION BY DOCTORS ORDERS
97
ON THE BALCONY
106
THE LADY OF THE CAMELLIAS
116
WELCOME HOME
123
SPEAKING OF SECOND MARRIAGES
130
THE HEIRESS
203
CONSULTATION
210
A TALL DARK LADY
222
IN PLACE OF A NURSE
233
THE DAUGHTER
242
THE CRUCIAL TEST
253
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About the author (2004)

OLIVE HIGGINS PROUTY (1882-1974), like many of her characters a wealthy Bostonian, was the author of ten novels, including Stella Dallas (1923), which became the basis for three films and a long-running radio serial. Her life was characterized by a struggle to balance her writing, which she worried was "selfish," with the needs of her family and later her philanthropic work. A graduate of Smith College, Prouty endowed a writer's scholarship at Smith that was received by Sylvia Plath, who later portrayed her patron unflatteringly in The Bell Jar.

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